Björk teaches you about electronics

As we often suspected, [Björk] is quite the technical mastermind. In the video above, she teaches you about the ins and outs of her television. We think she’s making a strong bid as the next person to join Prototype This! Her hacking philosophy is the same as ours: “You shouldn’t let poets lie to you.”

Eavesdrop on keyboards wirelessly

Every time you press a key on your keyboard, a small burst of electromagnetic radiation is let out. This radiation can be captured and decoded. Though it only affects some models, this is pretty serious. They tested 11 different keyboards and they were all vulnerable to at least one of the four methods of attack. Tests have shown that the data can be read through walls and up to 65 feet away. That is pretty scary stuff. Someone could be setting up in the apartment or office right next to yours to listen to every keystroke you type.  Check out the second video after the break.

[Read more...]

Art From Code: Generative Graphics

[Keith Peters]‘ blog Art From Code is devoted to his beautiful graphics from computer source code, also known as generative art. Although [Peters] is reluctant to reveal his source code, algorithmic graphics can be created with the help of tools like ActionScript, Flash, and Flex. There are some great tutorials that can start you on the path to making your own evocative art.

[via Neatorama]

Rovio teardown

[Del] sent us what might be the first in an expected plethora of hacks on the Wowee Rovio. He was annoyed by the poor lighting for Rovio’s camera so he cracked it open and started hacking. He found there was just enough space for a couple LEDs in the head. The most difficult part of this was apparently running the wires for power into the main body of the rovio. He said it took him around 30 minutes just to snake the wires through the neck. The final result is best seen in the comparison pictures of rovio looking at Wall-E.

Buy an oil cooled PC for $11k

For roughly $11,000 you cold have this awesome oil cooled computer rig. This system was designed specifically to be able to keep the electronics submerged in oil. The system uses SSD for storage, so everything can be submerged. Check out the pictures of the top panel, what is going on there?

If $11,000 is too much for you to spend, you could always do it yourself with an old aquarium, like this one, but be careful, that oil can get pretty messy. There is also a happy medium too, check out this method. Its nice, clean and not too expensive.

[via DVICE]

Keyless entry using touch sensing

[Alex] sent us this slick little keyless entry system. He wanted a discreet way to trigger the door to unlock. Knocking was too loud, and would give away his secret access code. He decided that touch sensors would be the best. Initially he planned on using the doorknob itself, which would have been awesome, but it was just too much surface area for his touch sensor. Ultimately, he settled for a wire he could touch.  An Arduino detects whether or not the correct code has been put in and initializes a high torque servo which turns the doorknob from the inside.  In the video, after the break, you can see that it works fairly well.

[Read more...]

Parts: Chip sockets for dual in-line package (DIP)

DIP through-hole chips are an old package with instantly recognizable dual in-line pin rows.  Beginners love these chips because they’re large and look easy to solder; we abhor them because we hate messing around with the drill. Whatever your motivation for using a through-hole chip, use a socket whenever possible. A circuit board with socketed chips is easy to test without endangering the parts, and ICs can be removed, tested, and replaced, without resorting to a soldering iron. This week, by request, we looked at several common through-hole chip sockets. [Read more...]

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