I need someone to explain this to me.

Replacing a point and shoot lens

cockeyed

Cockeyed.com is a peculiar site. It is spattered with links in an almost unintelligible manner, but if you dig hard enough, or just click randomly, you can find some pretty fun stuff. One nice writeup they’ve done is how to replace the lens in their point and shoot camera. This one happens to be a Canon Powershot sd750, but it will give you an idea about how difficult it can be for any point and shoot. The lens assembly couldn’t be replaced until almost every single piece had been disassembled. There are tons of pictures showing the process and the final result. Though the install was a success, his replacement lens was already beat up pretty bad. Looks like he’ll have to go through it all again.

[via The Old New Thing]

24 Solid State Drives in Raid

In a time when marketing is all around us, companies often have to come up with new and creative ways to get us excited. Some go the viral route, others hire famous spokes people. Samsung did well with this idea. Let some computer geeks build something awesome and have fun with it. They chained 24 drives together to create a whopping 6Terrabyte array. They run various speed tests and even test the drive integrity by bouncing on a trampoline while dangling them from their chords. Yeah, they make the computer geeks a little geekier than they need to be, but who didn’t get excited to see those transfer speeds?

Parts: 4×4 RGB button pad controller SPI

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We covered SparkFun’s new RGB button pad controller a few weeks ago. This is a full-color clone of the monome interface; a 4×4 grid of buttons with tri-color LEDs underneath. Each LED has 24bits of color control, for more than 16million color combinations. Up to 10 panels can be chained together to create huge button grids, like SparkFun’s Tetris table. We previously used a smaller version in our RGB combination lock.

We asked SparkFun to send us the SPI version of the button controller to test. This is a new product developed in-house at SparkFun, with open source hardware and software. Read about our experience interfacing this board below.

[Read more...]

Motion detecting cat toy

We love our pets, but sometimes we just can’t keep up with them all the time. Sometimes, we need some automated playmates for our furry pals. [Kateham] has built a motion detecting cat toy to keep their cat content and active. Their price list was roughly $5 for the whole project, but they did obtain things like microcontrollers from family members. Some places they did manage to cut costs were to harvest various parts from a VHS deck. Its great to see kids not only hacking, but recycling as well. Great job [Kateham]. This project is like a simpler version of the laser pup.