Make cotton candy at home

If you are anything like us, you are suddenly filled with childlike glee when you think of big fluffy poofs of cotton candy. The thought of making it at home has a certain appeal, but that machine is a mystery reserved only for those elite enough to get through cotton candy maker school. Or so we thought. As it turns out, it is actually quite simple. You can make one and be serving cotton candy in an afternoon with parts you probably have sitting around. The video above is pretty easy to follow, but if you want more information, there’s an instructable as well.

[via MakeZine]

Comments

  1. h_2_o says:

    lol that was awesome.

  2. BiOzZ says:

    ok now someone HAS to use this knowledge to make a giant cotton candy machine

  3. Eddie says:

    I would be wary of the cotton candy you made considering the different metal parts used. Stainless steel would be better and safer in my opinion. Remember that even cereal boxes have had PCBs in them – one reason why plastic bags are used inside the box – and then there is the safety of the plastic bags and different types of plastics – even plastics that were supposedly OK have BPA.

    WERE’RE DOOMED!

  4. Matt says:

    Considering that this metal was used in a drink container it should be safe. Bare metal isn’t dangerous unless it is coated with something, and he removed the coating. It looks like steel though not necessarily stainless.

    But it wouldn’t be too hard to do this from stainless steel if you have access to a lathe or mill.

  5. Stranger says:

    I’m just trying to imagine the mess that thing made. Green crap plastered across that guys chest :P

  6. Skitchin says:

    Cool, but he lost points for not proving you can eat it! ;)

    @HAD: What ever happened to that hack a day community/forums that was being discussed a few months back?

  7. Life2Death says:

    IT COULD FEED BACK INTO THE MAINS!

  8. Ghrayfahx says:

    Ok, I admit this is pretty cool, but SERIOUSLY! Look at the date the instructable was published. October of _07_! Yeah, the youtube vid is new, but he even says it’s not his project. He just built it according to the instructable 2.5 years later, and recorded it. How is this new and exciting HAD?

  9. John says:

    @Ghrayfahx

    I’d never seen it. Thanks Hackaday!

  10. IcyHotStunta says:

    I really like it. It might be from 07 but it’s new to me. The commercial candy machine heads are very expensive and this simple solution seems to work.You might be able to substitute the bottle caps for another metal food container, for example a round tuna container.

    For heating, I think I would go with a heat gun set on low and directed towards the top of the container. Seems like it would take forever using a small lighter.

    I might actually give this project a try. It’s a simple and rewarding project and parts are easily substituted.

  11. tyco says:

    Why not just modify the guts from an old hot-air popcorn popper, and replace its motor with something that spins much faster? Then you know you have food-safe parts.

  12. me says:

    Thanks Life2Death, you made me laugh :D

    But seriously, molten sugar is hot, someone could burn themselves, I think it is really irresponsible to post this without a disclaimer. You better call your lawyers…

    :P

  13. Mythgarr says:

    @tyco
    Hot air popcorn makers use a different principal – a heat gun is directed toward the kernels which keeps them in constant motion and slowly heats them until the moisture content causes them to explode into white, fluffy goodness.

    A cotton candy maker spins while heating the sugar. While the sugar is crystalline, it cannot escape through the small holes. Once it melts it flows through the holes and crystallizes more or less instantly into a long string, providing the texture.

    The holes in a hot air popcorn maker would probably be too large to work – the sugar would just be thrown out before melting.

  14. markii says:

    Thanks hackaday, I always wanted to know how this stuff works.

  15. Drone says:

    Where’s the Arduino?

    Someone had to say it.

  16. kgrube says:

    So did he just use baking/cooking sugar with green food coloring as the “mix”?

  17. Pete says:

    I am way too OCD to make something that sticky and messy. In fact it is really creeping me out.

  18. William says:

    Those of you that are saying that the various metals used in this demo are okay, you are very wrong.

    Dissimilar metals will cause potentially toxic corrosion. YOU have NO idea what’s REALLY in that brass/bronze or where it came from and what other metals are in it.

    For food safety: Stainless steel when making food preparation items – contact surfaces, or areas near the prep area. Food grade silver-solder can be also used to join parts together.

  19. Jay says:

    Maybe someone can help me here… I put together my own and I get such a breeze off of the spinning piece that the fire is blown out. I have tried adjusting things but the results is still the same.

  20. Rollyn01 says:

    @Jay

    Is the spinning piece centered? If not, the piece would actually be creating some wind via the Coandă effect. The off-center rotation would push a little bit of air around it and, since it’s rotating at high speeds, blow out the flame. Try heating it from below( taking breaks as not to heat up the motor) or use a hot light bulb.

  21. noonevac says:

    i bought a plastic on for the kids (even has a clown on the side) for like $20 and it works great. and safe. not really something worth trying to build from unsafe crap

  22. nateL says:

    @noonevac

    You can buy one?! No way! I hope you posted that over on Buy-a-Day.

    I think you got your sites mixed up.

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