Stretch-bike

This long bike is built for haulin’. After needing to find a truck to transport his welding equipment (ironically in order to build another bike) [Nick Johnson] decided it was time to make a two-wheeled cargo transport. He extended the frame in order to add a cradle in the front. Eventually there will be sides on that box but for now it works like a charm for transporting his groceries. With the long wheel-base this should be pretty stable as long as you balance your cargo. We’d certainly be more apt to try a ride on this rather than the double-decker death-trap from a few weeks ago.

26 thoughts on “Stretch-bike

  1. If I were going through the extra lengths of modding the bike, I would double up the front tire so that load balancing is less of an issue. Just my preference, anyways.

  2. This is essentially a bakfiet, the standard cargo bike in Amsterdam. However, I’m sure this cost way less than the $3k those bikes sell for here.

  3. Transport bikes for carrying gear are long like this, but usually have the extra space in the back.

    I’ve seen several around town – some just have big saddlebags across the back, and others have a “trunk.”

    It makes more sense to me to put the storage in the back. It keeps the steering mechanism standard, and doesn’t mess with the center of gravity as much (since the rider + gear system already shift the COG towards the back)

  4. I think there are trailers which are far easier to construct/attach/steer with that I’d rather use than this. It looks massively unstable and hard to drive.

  5. I recommend looking the word ‘ironic’ up in a dictionary. It would have been ironic if he needed to haul the welding equipment home for this bike. Just sayin’

  6. When I first looked at the picture I thought he had put two wheels on either side of the front cargo holder and used a simple steering setup (like on go carts etc). That’s how I would have done it. Otherwise cool bike.

  7. Cool build, but really, I prefer my 6cyl Toyota T100 for hauling the diesel arc welder, oxygen and acetylene tanks, mig welder, etc…

    Just get a pickup truck — you’ll never want another type of automobile afterward, and you’ll end up hauling your stretch bikes in it. ;)

  8. On the subject of bikes my left leg can only bend to about 85 degrees any ideas for a bike that I would be able to pedal?

  9. Some of you have asked how it rides. It actually rides really good, but has the steering radius of a city bus ;)

    @roy – yes, bakfietsen already exist. That’s why the title of my blog post is “DIY Bakfiets”—HaD chose the title “stretch-bike.” Bakfietsen sell for about $6000 US. I made this for about $100.

    @M4CGYV3R – In paragraph 3, I mention why I don’t like trailers.

    @supershwa – I hear you, but my goal is to NOT burn gas.

    Nick

  10. I like it, I’ve seen them before and they are a good idea but I’ed still perfer this mode on a trike, not a bike.

  11. there’s a guy the next town over building pro-version of the same. saw them at a bike market. they do cost a few €€€, but are darn sturdy: http://bit.ly/aEI1JC

    also, i live in a farming community and LOTs of farmers around here have and use two-wheeled bike trailers. looks like they have been in use around here – judging by some of the antique ones i’ve seen – for a long, long time.

  12. forgot to mention, the coolest thing about the cetma (i think) is that he made it so it can come apart into two pieces, making it easier to ship.

    anyway, wicked bike. i’ve always wanted one like this but the terrain where i live keeps it from being practical, so our family has several xtracycles and xtracycle-like bikes.

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