Yet Another Cat Door

Cat Flap Fever

RFID cat flaps are one of those projects we see all of the time. They are generally pretty simple to rig up, not too expensive, and have a good “wow” factor for any non-technical friends or family, not to mention tremendously useful. Why did we decide to share this one? Well, for one, it is simple. It doesn’t tweet, email, or text message, it just gets the job done. Two, it is excellently documented, including a detailed parts list and a step by step schematic just about anyone could use to build their own. [landmanr] does mention that he recommends some sort of project enclosure to protect the electronics from damage, which would be bad for the poor cat stuck outside.

Comments

  1. Bill Porter says:
  2. Eugene says:

    Yeah, an enclosure to protect it from the cat!

  3. Frogz says:

    explain 1 part to me
    how do you keep said cat from finding all of those fun tasty dangling wires and using them to either a: play with or b: clean his teeth

  4. Hirudinea says:

    It says the cat has an rfid on it, but many cats have an implanted ID chip, which is also rfid, couldn’t you read that (if you had a properly equiped cat?)

  5. Scott says:

    @Hirudinea – That’s what I want too, but I can’t seem to find any good info on reading the #@$% implanted RFID tags. They use a special protocol or something and aren’t read by standard 125k RFID readers.

    Anyone know how to read an implanted pet RFID tag with an arduino, etc?

  6. Trebu says:

    The chips animals are implanted with (as I understand it) come in two different varieties. The older variety had a flaw where it is hard to read even if you know where it is. The newer one takes care of that but the range still is not great. The chips also have a tendency to drift away from there original position(back of the neck) A RFID tag in the collar would be my choice implementation. The reader would be easer to setup (on the door rather then in an animal tunnel)

  7. mike says:

    I made mine to read the imbedded RFID tag, however I used a modified ag RFID reader, It may be because most standard hobby modules just read HDX tags rather than the full duplex tags commonly used to tag pets?

  8. phuzz says:

    My folks recently bought a commercial version of this, that uses the implanted chips in their cats.
    It seems to work pretty well, and has about a 4-6″ range.
    The only difficult bit was persuading the cats to go through the receiver the first time to program them in. Why is it that cats can always tell when you want to do something undignified with them?
    I has scratches.

  9. strider_mt2k says:

    My cat(RIP) would have had those wires shredded up in a jiff, but the pic is probably from the early stages.

    It’s always cool to see these types of projects.

  10. TomF says:

    Quote: Why did we decide to share this one? Well, for one, it is simple.

    Well, not as simple as the one I saw recently in a program about this eccentric british inventor Arthur Pedrick:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_Paul_Pedrick#Chromatically_selective_cat_flap

    Essentially he uses a light sensor to keep the neighbour’s black cat out…

  11. addidis says:

    I live in chicago and its really cold. So my cat figured out that I tap the space heater to get the thermostat to kick on or off. My cat now walks in and bats the nob of the heater trying to get it to turn on. Seeing this makes me think my idea to build a cat switch for the heater might not be as crazy as i had thought.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 93,625 other followers