Rotary Wall Plug from Scrap

Rotary tools such as a Dremel are useful to have around for all sorts of tasks in a workshop, including cutting, polishing, and grinding. [Konstantin] sent us in his home made wall mount rotary tool based off of parts from a blender and an old bench top jigsaw. Unlike a Dremel where the motor is in the hand held part of the tool, this setup hides the blender motor (which provides the power) behind a wall panel, and is controlled via the blender’s speed settings buttons. We could see this configuration allowing for more delicate work due to the reduction of weight in hand, as well as the added bonus of a near impossibility of losing this tool. Overall an excellent re-purposing of leftover parts, be sure to check out [Konstantin]‘s blog for more build info and photos.

Comments

  1. walt says:

    I bet he used his rotary tool to make the hold for his rotary wall plug.

    1st!

  2. cpmike says:

    My friend’s dad is a jewelry artist, and he has a great setup like this: an oldschool rotary tool with external motor hanging from the ceiling, with the head on a long flexible extension. On the wall are raised strips of magnet, with hundreds of bits/wheels/files lined up and super easy to access. All it needs is a quick-change head, and to be in my workroom haha

  3. Jakezilla says:

    Cool hack, but more info about the flex shaft and coupling would be good. Personally I like the versatility and portability of a Dremel 4000 and a Dremel 225-01 Flex Shaft.

  4. Aaron says:

    I’ve got a dead blender and I can’t find my Dremel, so this is awesome!

  5. madwelder says:

    Nice job.

    If you want lightweight tools, pneumatics are, pound-for-pound, the way to go.

    Having the tool fixed to a work station really helps stop “borrowing,” and even wholesale theft; having to disconnect/cut a wire or hose seems to stop a lot of people.

    An aside on the anti-theft aspect: A relative worked in a plant where all the portable tools were 220V and the company was clear that it was done as a theft deterrent. Like fixed tools it didn’t truly make stealing tools any harder but turned out to be a real deterrent.

  6. PAPPP says:

    This is basically a poor man’s Foredom tool, which is pretty awesome since a real Foredom setup costs a good $300-400.

  7. This is clever. It reminds me a lot of a shearing shed, where the shears are driven by a motor in a different room and the power moved down shafts.

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