Hacker Classifieds featured find: Free Sony video wall projectors

projectors

[paulgeering] has a set of 10 video projectors, usually found inside Sony’s RVP 4010Q 40″ rear projection system that he must get rid of.  He is offering them up for free to any Hack-a-Day reader that is interested. He doesn’t have the room to store them any longer, but he can’t bear to see them go into the trash. These projectors can still be found for sale online to the tune of $3500 apiece, making this an incredible bargain!

All he requests is that you either pick them up or pay for shipping from the UK. He is willing to part out the projectors and ship individual parts if requested.

If you do end up having one of these shipped to you, be sure to keep us posted on what you do with it. We would love to see some giant video wall hacks in the near future.

If you have something lying around that needs to go, be sure to post it in our classifieds.

Literally turn your headset into a handset

[Rachel's] Bluetooth glove is proving that you don’t have to be missing fingers to talk to the hand. You can see in the video after the break that, like us, she wears fingerless gloves while typing to keep the cold from causing pain in her hands (it’s so cold in here it’s like we’re [Bob Cratchit]). So why not make those gloves multitaskers?

She cracked open a small Bluetooth headset to see if it would play nicely with her fuzzy purple gloves. A bit of wire and some shrink tubing allowed for the speaker and microphone to be moved a bit further from the circuit board. Once those components had been extended she pinned everything in place to make sure it fit the bill. The components were then sewn in place and a microswitch for answering calls was repositioned in the hollow of the wearer’s palm. Now you’re free to work the day away, with all of your incoming calls already at your fingertips.

[Read more...]

14.4 Kbps modem makes excuses for everything

If your boss is like [Michael Scott] you probably find yourself in constant need of plausible reasons for your action or inaction. Now you won’t have to waste away the workday coming up with those ideas yourself because this little box will always provide you with an excuse. It’s actually a 14.4 Kbps modem, which brings back memories of the early ISP days when you’ve find banks of these in the corner to service incoming calls. [Alex] altered the circuit board to map out an ICSP port for the PIC 16F690 that controls the system. Just use your key to unlock the Emergency Excuse Generator and press the button to spit out a doozy. The 8,000 word memory on the microprocessor stores all of the excuses which can be combined a number of different ways based on how the rules files is built. This rule file is by far the most interesting part of the build and worth looking over.

We think this would be a nice addition to the other office electronics you built.

[via Dangerous Prototypes]

Lilypad bicycle computer reads back distance in beeps

[Mark Fickett] finished his own interesting take on a bicycle computer. These wristwatch-sized devices normally mount to the handlebars and give feedback for current speed, trip distance, and many have options like cadence and heart rate. [Mark's] has fewer features but it’s clean, simple, and does more than you’d think.

He used some denim to house the electronics which you can see mounted inside the frame of the bike. He’s chosen to use Lilypad components which are Arduino bits meant to be sewn into textiles. We’ve seen a Morse Code keyer using these components and this project is along the same lines. It reads wheel revolutions from a magnetic sensor mounted on the front fork. It has no LCD readout, but when you want to know how far you’ve traveled just press one button and the computer reads it back to in Morse Code played on a tiny piezo buzzer. This package hides one more nice option. Once you arrive home the trip data can be dumped onto a computer for easy graphing. Check out the video after the break to see these features in action.

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Forum addition: project requests

We’ve added a new section to our forums called Requests and Commissions. First, we can’t stress enough that this is NOT a place to ask for help with illegal or illicit actions. Hackaday has always been about hacking for good and that’s what motivated the creation of this forum. Time and again we’ve seen hackers helping out others by modifying gaming controllers for the those in need or bringing mobility to the disabled. The requests forum is a great place to ask for help with these types of projects, or just to team up with hackers that have skills in areas you don’t.

So swing by and check it out. The golden rule is keep it legal and keep it legit. And do remember that this is the Internet, so think about the decisions you are making. We’re not going to swoop in to save you if you end up getting scammed by a Nigerian prince to whom you sent a thousand dollars worth of parts to but didn’t receive a completed project in return. Any arrangements you make with another user are between you two, and do not involve us.

Wiimote-based whiteboard lets you write on any surface

propeller_whiteboard

The Wiimote is a fantastic tool for hackers, given their affordability and how easy they are to work with. [Gareth] had a “eureka” moment while working on another Wiimote-based project, and with some alterations, converted it into an electronic whiteboard.

The whiteboard was built using the IR sensor he extracted from a Wiimote, which is wired to an EasyProp board to process the input. The Wiimote is aimed at a LCD screen, which can be “drawn” upon using a light pen he constructed from an IR led and a few batteries. Any movement of the pen is tracked by the Wiimote’s IR sensor and converted to an XY coordinate, which is then painted on the screen. The sensor has the ability to track up to four points at a time, so you can theoretically use up to four pens simultaneously.

[Gareth] points out that the sensor is not limited to tracking small displays, as the white board can be easily scaled up in size using any kind of rear projection device.

Continue reading to see a video of his whiteboard in action.

[Read more...]

Simple fixes breathe new life into aging game consoles

dreamcast_repair

While the Sega Dreamcast has long been out of production, there is an avid fanbase that loves the console dearly. As with many CD/DVD-based consoles, the Dreamcast can sometimes run into issues reading discs, at which point all games are unplayable.

Instructables user [Andrew] got his hands on a pair of the consoles and found that one could not read CDs, while the other suffered from a fried controller interface board, the result of a controller wiring mix-up on his part. Determined to get the consoles up and running again, he disassembled them and got to work, sharing his fixes with us.

The CD drive fix is a pretty standard one. He first needed to locate the potentiometer that regulates the laser. Once he did, a slight counter-clockwise turn is all it required in order to increase the laser’s voltage. Once he did this, he popped in a game to see if it worked. No longer greeted with a disc read error when he powered on his Dreamcast, he reassembled the console and began work on the other one.

To fix his controller issues, [Andrew] had to remove the entire controller board from the console. He eventually located a resistor that had been damaged by his wiring mishap, and replaced it. The console was tested and seeing that the controllers worked again, he put everything back together.

While this pair of fixes is not incredibly complex, it’s nice to see people sharing their tips for bringing these consoles back to life.

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