Making a spray booth from an old dishwasher

For several years, [Randy]’s spray paint booth was a simple cardboard box. Sure, it kept the overspray contained to a small area, but there was a lot of room for improvement. Luckily, after replacing his dishwasher he had the makings of an excellent spray paint booth that can be put together in a few hours.

The build began by tearing apart the old dishwasher and getting rid of just about everything; the door, plumbing, and electrical were all discarded leaving [Randy] with a plastic husk. After installing a small fluorescent light, plugging the drain hole, and making a simple lazy Suzan, [Randy] had a proper spray booth on his hands.

[Randy] opted not to put in a ventilation system; he was, after all, working with non-toxic vapors. If you’re planning on gutting a dishwasher for use with some nasty chemicals, it might be a good idea to use the drain hole as a ventilation port.

11 thoughts on “Making a spray booth from an old dishwasher

  1. I had to google “Lazy Susan” to understand what it was. For my fellow foreigners:

    A lazy susan is one of those rotating trays, mostly used for moving food on top of a table.

  2. Cool idea!

    I once build a ‘tent’ out of plastic sheets (added bonus is that these are statically charged, attracting some of the dust that would otherwise get into the paint…).

  3. …non-toxic sprays…so no aerosol propellants? Those fumes may not kill you, but they will give you one heck of a migraine and stink up your place :)

  4. I feel that a mechanism to capture overspray is essential for high quality. Hence “downdraft” booths. Of course this could be added.

  5. Might be trolling a bit here but I really don’t quite get it… He took a box and put a lazy suzan in it… Hurray!
    Now, make the light explosion proof and put a down draft system in it with an explosion proof fan assembly and he’ll have something worth posting about… But other than that, it looks like something a cardboard box would do nicely for, and a lot harder to get rid of once your done with it, and where the heck to you store something like this until the next time you use it without filling it up with crap?

    1. Well you have to get rid of it anyway even if you don’t convert it into a spray booth so what’s that got to do with it? If you have a *need* for a spray booth you would generally have the room for one as well. I have an old washing machine sitting in a shed simply because it has become too expensive to dispose of these sorts of things now thanks to the tree huggers.

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