Hacked Kobo Becomes a Weather Display

The Kobo e-reader has been hacked for a while now. It’s pretty easy to enable telnet access by modifying some files. Once [Kevin] was able to telnet into the device and draw to the display, he created the Kobo Wifi Weather Forecast. This hack was inspired by the Kindle weather display that we discussed in the past, but this version runs entirely on the Kobo.

The weather report software is written in Python using the pygame library. After loading the software package onto a Kobo, a few commands are run over telnet to set up Python and run the display. Since Python and pygame run on the Kobo, it allows for direct access to the e-ink display.

There’s a lot of possibilities for a internet connected e-ink device running custom graphics code. It’s asking to be turned into any kind of display you can imagine. What ideas do you have for a custom e-ink display? Let us know in the comments.

Debugging the Stellaris with OpenOCD

It looks as though Texas Instruments are really reaching out to the hacker community with their new ARM-powered Stellaris dev board. On the Stellarisiti forums, a member asked about the debugging options for the Stellaris board. The Stellaris already features an In-Circuit Debug Interface (ICDI), but unfortunately it’s a little hard to get working in Linux-ey environments.

One of the devs for the Open On-Chip Debugger was already talking with TI to get the ICDI spec released for the Stellaris board. TI released the info, and after quite a bit of work, everything is open for all to see.

Right now, OpenOCD support for the Stellaris is still incomplete, but there is an project up on the Gits that allows for multi-platform development for TI’s new board.

Needless to say, getting everything up and running is still a chore. That’s not really a concern, though; the Stellaris has only been around for a few months and it takes devs time to put all the required tools into nice, neat packages. We’re just glad TI is being so forthcoming with the relevant documentation, lest development becomes a million times harder.

4096 LEDs means the biggest LED cube ever

Adaptive Computing, a cloud management and high performance computing outfit in Utah, needed something really cool to bring to their trade shows. Something that makes order out of chaos, and demonstrates their attention to detail in the midst of miles of wiring. They decided building the largest non-commercial LED cube would be a good project, and thus the 16x16x16 All Spark Cube was born.

The All Spark Cube was constructed using 10 mm RGB LEDs wired together with three-foot lengths of 16 ga pre-tinned copper wire. In this video, [Kevin] shows off the process of constructing a single row; first the LEDs are placed in a jig, the leads are bent down, and a bus wire is soldered to 16 individual anodes per row.

The hardware for the build uses 16 Arduino Megas with a custom-made shield powering a 16×16 LED grid. The custom shields provide the 24V for the LEDs, 5V for the ‘duino, The Arduino boards communicate to each other through an RS485 connection, and the entire cube is connected to a computer through an RS232 serial connection.

The software is, admittedly, still a little janky. [Spencer] and [Thomas], the Adaptive Computing volunteers that are working on the control system, are still having a few problems getting logos and animations to display. They have managed to create a control app to draw individual pixels, as seen after the break.

Not bad for nearly a mile of wire and a summer’s worth of work, huh?

[Read more...]

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 93,658 other followers