66% or better

Blending real objects with 3D prints

It’s very subtle, but if you saw [Greg]‘s 3D printed stone to Lego adapter while walking down the street, it might just cause you to stop mid-stride.

This modification to real objects begin with [Greg] taking dozens of pictures of the target object at many different angles. These pictures are then imported into Agisoft PhotoScan which takes all these photos and converts it into a very high-resolution, full-color point cloud.

After precisely measuring the real-world dimensions of the object to be modeled, [Greg] imported his point cloud into Blender and got started on the actual 3D modeling task. By reconstructing the original sandstone block in Blender, [Greg] was also able to model Lego parts.After subtracting the part of the model above the Lego parts, [Greg] had a bizarre-looking adapter that adapts Lego pieces to a real-life stone block.

It’s a very, very cool projet that demonstrates how good [Greg] is at making 3D models of real objects and modeling them inside a computer. After the break you can see a walkthrough of his work process, an impressive amount of expertise wrapped up in making the world just a little more strange.

Comments

  1. Isaac says:

    That is really, really, really cool. It doesn’t really come across in the image at the top… but the video is insanely eye opening.

  2. Chris C. says:

    [Greg]‘s skill and the overall effect are amazing.

    Though if that 3D printed corner fit perfectly on the real rock the *first time* without any trimming, I have to say I’m more amazed with Photoscan; as I didn’t know such accuracy was possible.

  3. kitsu says:

    Super cool. I assume he has his parts printed by Shapeways? Owning a high-res full color printer is unlikely, and while hand painting is possible it sure looks like he’s using the textures from his models.

    Also he never once used Blender in the video. He used Z-brush and 3dstudio max.

  4. Ifrit says:

    There is a little mistake: [Greg] uses “3ds Max” and not “Blender” (But, as he said: same process/result may be achieved with other soft like Blender)

    But It does nothing to the fact that it’s amazing !
    Thanks Hackaday to highlights this work !

  5. Conner Smith says:

    This is cool and all, but I think this was posted before.

  6. Nat'n says:

    Isn’t that 3DS Max, not blender?

  7. DanJ says:

    Brilliant.

  8. soopergooman says:

    Completely Awesome! I want a sandstone lego replacement.

  9. guest says:

    Sorry but I can’t see him using Blender.

  10. 1000100 1000001 1010110 1000101 says:

    Ok, I absolutely love this.

  11. me says:

    I’d print some holodeck grid to cover broken bits of wall.

  12. Peter says:

    How about using it as a top banner for this website, i mean essentially this hack is awesome. Its the hack of the year.
    From a hackers point of view, it shows that the world isn’t made of atoms, quarks, neutrons etc.
    Its a hacking proof that the world is made from lego

    Anny comments from the LHC… ?
    No ?
    Ok nobel price granted haha ..its awesome !

  13. andar_b says:

    Love it. Now do it with Minecraft blocks :D

    Seriously though, the meltey brick was almost as cool. The skull in the ‘unused models’ bit at the end would have been amazing to see on film as well.

  14. Anon says:

    Typo: The Agisoft PhotoScan link has a extra single quote in it.

    Correct link: http://www.agisoft.ru/products/photoscan/standard/

  15. Eugene says:

    The world is secretly constructed of Legos!

  16. wowme@wtf.com says:

    Soon we will all live in a biltmore house!

  17. Will says:

    First glance I thought he had done the reverse, made custom LEGOs that looked like stone. That would be equally cool. A modern version of those fake rocks you hide keys and crap in.

  18. Rob says:

    Open source, we cry (rather pathetically, and with little hope of an answer). Building the rock around the lego is the way to go monetarily, sadly. Software =$200, 3D print maybe $50, tools to cut the sandstone about $150. Compared with lego (free-ish from bleating kids) and some sand and cement (“borrowed” from a building site)

    It is cool though.

  19. M4CGYV3R says:

    For those of you like me who can’t seem to get any vimeo embeds or links working, WIMP caught it with a much better player:
    http://www.wimp.com/creativeprinting/

  20. Kris Lee says:

    It looks like the objects that have many features work pretty well with this software.

    I did a test with quite uniform object and with the same amount of pictures did not get very good result.

    I will do more tests because the software looks very interesting.

  21. Bob Webb says:

    I don’t own a 3D printer but this point cloud method is really impressive.

  22. Heath Dutton says:

    I see a future in this concept with prosthetics? Artists like this guy, with the 3D bio printers of tomorrow, will be replacing bones instead of bricks.

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