Reverse engineering shopping cart security

All this talk about 555 timers is causing projects to pop out of the woodwork like this one that reverse engineers a shopping cart security mechanism. The wheel seen above listens for a particular magnetic signal and when encountered it locks down the yellow cowl, preventing the wheel from touching the ground and making the cart very hard to move.

[Nolan Blender] acquired one of these wheels for testing purposes and he’s posted some details about the hardware inside. But the first thing he did was to put together some test equipment to help find out details about the signal that trips the mechanism. He connected a coil to an audio amplifier and walked around the market looking for strong signals. Once he found a few strong bursts with that equipment he grabbed an oscilloscope, hooked it to the coil, and made some measurements. He found an 8 kHz signal at a 50% duty cycle at 30 ms intervals (it would be hard to make a better case for why you need an oscilloscope).

With the specs in hand, [Nolan] grabbed two 555 timers, an audio amplifier, and a 200 turn antenna around a ferrite core to build his own locking mechanism. If you’re ever stopped short in the middle of the market, just look for the hacker at the end of the aisle holding the homemade electronics.

[Photo source]

[Thanks Colin]

Capslocker 2

caps

Almost exactly a year ago, we posted the random USB capslocker. [Garrett] has revisited the idea to build a smaller, neater version. He has posted the build process to give us an idea how he goes about building things. The overall build is quite nice, but part if its neatness can be attributed to the fact that he had access to an Epilog laser cutter. If you think you might be using one in the near future, this is a great writeup for you.

[via the Hack a Day flickr pool]

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 96,577 other followers