Tinkercad does Arduino

If you’ve done 3D printing, you’ve probably at least heard of Tinkercad. This popular CAD package runs in your browser and was rescued from oblivion by Autodesk a few years ago. [Chuck] recently did a video about a new Tinkercad feature: building and simulating virtual Arduino circuits. You can watch it below.

There are a variety of components you can add to your design. You’ll find an integrated code editor and a debugger. You can even get to the serial monitor, all in your browser with no actual Arduino hardware. You can also build simple circuits that don’t use an Arduino, although the component selection is somewhat limited.

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Multipurpose ESP8266 keychain

One of the best feature of the ESP8266 is its ability to self-host a web server, allowing for fairly complicated user interactions. The dEEbugger by [S-March] is a nifty little ESP8266 based device with a plethora of features in a small package.

The USB-powered device has a web user interface that enables it to be used as a low-bandwidth oscilloscope, I2C terminal, or UART terminal. As a scope, you may connect to it via your tablet and then use it as a remote voltage monitor. There is a peak detection feature which is a nice touch and gives the entire project a premium feel.

The serial terminal on an ESP8266 is not something new yet it is helpful in disconnecting the console window from the bench. The I2C terminal is where the device really shines as it can scan for connected devices on the connected bus. This Bus-Pirate like feature is useful for beginners as the software can scan the registers addresses of the devices as well.

[S-March] has made the schematic in PDF format as well as the entire code for the project available on GitHub so go right ahead and make it your own. We have had an ESP8266 based VT Terminal device in the past and merging the two would make for an excellent maker tool.

Thanks for the tip [René Arts]

Adding a debugger to a Teensy 3.5/3.6

The Teensy is a powerful ARM-based development board with loads of features that can do fun stuff with USB as well. Like many dev boards, it uses a less powerful processor as an interface. Teensy designer [Paul Stoffregen] added a debug header to allow direct SWD JTAG access to the main chip, but the interface microcontroller has to be silenced for that to work, and the code to do so is still in progress.

Impatient, [Erich Styger] documents the changes he made to add support for the J-Link SWD protocol by removing the offending NXP Kinetis KL02Z that serves as the as the onboard interface and bootloader that helps the Arduino IDE talk to the K64F which is the main chip. After the KL02Z was removed, [Erich] populated the debug headers and then wired up the Segger J-Link to the board and tested it out with Eclipse, GDB, and standard SWD debug tools.

The end result is a Cortex M4F board that can work with standard tools at a third of the price of the Kinetis’ development board. [Paul Stoffregen] confirms that the debugging functionality will be added to the bootloader code soon but until then, a hardware hack is a working, if brutal, approach to debugging on the platform.

More information on the JTAG interface is available for the interested. And if Teensy isn’t your thing, you might consider an STM32-based development board.

Shmoocon 2016: Efficient Debugging For OS X

Developers love their macs, and if you look at the software that comes with it, it’s easy to see why. OS X is a very capable Unix-ey environment that usually comes on very capable hardware. There is one, huge, unbelievable shortcoming in OS X: the debugger sucks. GDB, the standard for every other platform, doesn’t come with OS X and Apple’s replacement, LLDB is very bad. After crashing Safari one too many times, [Brandon Edwards] and [Tyler Bohan] decided they needed their own debugger, so they built one, and presented their work at last weekend’s Shmoocon.

Building a proper tool starts with a survey of existing tools, and after determining that GDB was apparently uninstallable and LLDB sucked, their lit review took a turn for the more esoteric. Bit Slicer is what they landed on. It’s a ‘game trainer’ or something that allows people to modify memory. It sort of works like a debugger, but not really. VDB was another option, but again this was rough around the edges and didn’t really work.

The problems with the current OS X debuggers is that the tools used by debuggers don’t really exist. ptrace is neutered, and the system integrity protection in OS X El Capitan has introduced protected locations that can not be written to by root. Good luck modifying anything in /Applications if you have any recent Mac.

With the goal of an easy-to-use debugger that was readily scriptable, [Brandon] and [Tyler] decided to write their own debugger. They ended up writing the only debugger they’ve seen that is built around kqueue instead of ptrace. This allows the debugger to be non-invasive to the debugged process, inject code, and attach to multiple processes at once.

For anyone who has every stared blankly at the ‘where is GDB’ Stack Overflow answers, it’s a big deal. [Brandon] and [Tyler] have the beginnings of a very nice tool for a very nice machine.

Showing an AVR Programmer Who’s Boss

[Bogdan] makes a good point. When you use a dev board you get programming, debugging, power sourcing, and usually a UART. When you go to the trouble of hooking up a programmer why don’t you get the same thing? Astutely, he points out that all you usually get with programmers is programming. So he set out to add features to the hardware he uses to program XMEGA.

The first part of the trick hinges on his use of PDI programming. This is slightly different from ISP programming. Both use a six-pin connector cable but with PDI two of these pins are unused. He took this opportunity to reroute the chip’s TX and RX pins through the cable, which now gives him an avenue to use a UART-to-USB adapter without adding any cables to his target board. Rather than add a second USB cable he rolled a USB hub into the mix. An LM1117 regulates the 5V USB rail down to 3.3V as a source for the target board.

The programmer being used is an Atmel ICE. As you might imagine he didn’t want to make permanent alterations to it. His modifications are all handled externally, with one IDC cable connecting the programmer to his added circuitry and another headed off to the target board. For now he’s jumpering RX/TX to the programming header but plans to route the signals on future PCBs.

Dual Port RAM Teaches an Old NES New Tricks

nesDPR

[Andrew] is developing a game for the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES). Emulators are great for this, but [Andy] loves running on the real iron. To help, he’s created a dual port RAM interface for his NES. As the name implies, a dual port RAM is a memory with two separate data and address buses. The Cypress Semiconductor CY7C136 [Andy] used also includes arbitration logic to ensure that both ports don’t attempt to access the same memory cell and cause data corruption. In [Andy’s] case the NES was on one side, oblivious to the new hardware. On the other side of the dual port RAM, [Andy] installed an ATmega164 running his own custom firmware.

The new hardware gives [Andy] a live view of what’s going on in the NES’s memory. He added a live memory view/edit screen similar to the FCEUX emulator. The window runs on a PC while the game itself is running on an NES. [Andy] was even able to add rudimentary break and step features by connecting his circuit to the Non Maskable Interrupt (NMI) line of the NES. By holding the NMI asserted, the ATmega can essentially freeze the game in progress.

[Andy] has even used his circuit to teach the NES some new tricks. By reading the timer and score memory locations on Ice Hockey, he was able to create a scoreboard and goal light. Similar techniques were used to give Contra a muzzle flash light which puts Ambilight systems to shame.

We don’t know what [Andy] is planning next, but we hope it’s a source release so we can start hacking some some games ourselves!

Click past the break to see a couple of [Andy’s] Vine videos.

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Serial Monitor Without a PC

serial01

A serial monitor is an easy way to debug your projects. As we step through code, it’s nice to see a “Hey! I’m working, moving to next thing!” across the monitor, and not so nice to see nothing – the result of a bug that needs debugging. This has always meant needing a PC loaded with your favorite serial terminal program close at hand.

Most of the time this is not an issue, because the PC is used to compile the code and program the project at hand. But what if you’re in the field, with a mission of fixing a headless system, and in need a serial monitor? Why lug around your PC when you can make your own External Serial Monitor!

[ARPix] built this fully functional serial monitor based on an Atmega328 and a 102 x 64 LCD display. While it doesn’t have a keyboard port like this microcontroller based serial terminal, tact switches allow access to the user interface to start and stop the reading and set the baud rate. The Atmega328 has 2K of SRAM, which is needed for the project. Apparently, 1K was not enough to handle all the data. All code, schematics and a very well done parts layout are available, making this sure to be your next weekend project!