ChipWhisperer Hits Kickstarter

Even the most well designed crypto algorithms can be broken if someone is smart enough to connect an oscilloscope to a processor. Over the last 15 years or so, an entire domain of embedded security has cropped up around the techniques of power and side channel analysis. The tools are expensive and rare, but [Colin O’Flynn] and the ChipWhisperer are here to bring a new era of hardware security to the masses.

The ChipWhisperer was the second place winner of last year’s Hackaday Prize. It’s an interesting domain of security research, and something that was previously extremely expensive to study. If you’re looking for a general overview of what the ChipWhisperer does, you might want to check out when we bumped into [Colin] at DEFCON last year.

While the original goal of the ChipWhisperer was to bring the cost of the tools required for power and side channel analysis down to something a hackerspace or researcher could afford, this was still too expensive for a Kickstarter campaign. To that end, [Colin] designed the ChipWhisperer Lite, a cut-down version, but still something that does most of what the original could do.

There are two parts to the ChipWhisperer Lite – the main section contains a big microcontroller, a big FPGA, and a high gain, low noise amplifier. This is the core of the ChipWhisperer, and it’s where all the power analysis happens. The other part is a target board containing an XMega microcontroller. This is where you’ll run all your encryption algorithms, and where you’ll find out if they can be broken by power analysis. The main board and target board are held together by a break-away connection, so if you want to run a power analysis on another board, just snap the ChipWhisperer in half.

[Colin] is offering up a ChipWhisperer Lite for around $200 USD – far, far less than what these tools cost just a year ago. We’re looking forward to a successful campaign and all the neat findings people with this board will find.

In Chicago? Bring A Hack!

It’s been far too long since we’ve had a Hackaday presence at a hackerspace. This, of course, is a terrible oversight and something must be done to correct it. If you’re in Chicago, you’re in luck. We’re going to be at Pumping Station: One this Wednesday for a Bring-A-Hack meetup.

If you have a cool build to show off, a bunch of blinky things, wearables, or just some cool tech, the mythical Hackaday Prize guru [Sophi Kravitz] will be at PS:1 Wednesday evening. I’m pretty sure there will be stickers, but sadly no t-shirt cannon just yet.

The event is free, open to everyone, and there’s pizza. RSVPing would be a good idea, and you can do that over on the meetup.com page for the event.

PortableSDR Makes It To Kickstarter

Last year’s Hackaday Prize saw a lot of projects that were crying out to be Kickstarter Campaigns, but non has seen people throwing money at their screens quite like [Michael]’s PortableSDR. It’s a small, handheld, battery-powered shortwave software defined transceiver that can do just about everything with coverage up to 30MHz. It’s the ultimate apocalypse radio, a contender for to the throne now held by the ‘my first radio’ Baofeng, and now, finally, a campaign on Kickstarter.

The PortableSDR (now called the PSDR) started off as [Michael]’s ideal radio. It just so happened the Hackaday Prize gave him the impetus design, develop, and build the radio that would eventually land him third place in The Hackaday Prize.

The radio itself is completely self-contained and battery-powered, implementing a software defined radio on an STM32F4 processor. The design includes an LCD for the waterfall display, vector network analysis, and the ability to receive GPS.

In keeping with its ham heritage, [Michael] is offering the PSDR as a kit, with a PCB, enclosure, and all the parts you can’t get on Digikey available for a $250 pledge. Get those toaster reflow ovens warm, because there’s a lot of SMD parts in this build.

Continue reading “PortableSDR Makes It To Kickstarter”

We’re Hiring a Full-Time Hackaday Prize Mythical Creature

On occasion we advertise jobs for Hackaday but this time around is an exceptionally big deal. The Hackaday Prize was an amazing adventure this year, and we’re already hard at work on the plans for the 2015 Hackaday Prize. To realize our vision for the movement we need someone who will live and breathe THP. We need to find the Hackaday Prize Mythical Creature.

This person will hold in their mind all things Hackaday Prize. The HPMC will gallivant across the land (both digital and real) heralding the message of grass-roots, high-level hardware development. Obviously this involves recruiting highly skilled Hackers, Designers, and Engineers to compete for the prize. But the HPMC will also make sure that the amazing creations competing for the Prize get the widespread recognition they deserve.

There are a lot of nuts and bolts to the job. The HPMC will lead the planning of all live events. The many talents of the Hackaday and Supplyframe crews will be fully and efficiently tapped thanks to the legendary organizational and people skills wielded by the HPMC. Can you see why we’re calling this job candidate a Mythical Creature?

The point is, we are going to accomplish great things in 2015 and beyond. We need the perfect person to make sure it happens smoothly. Mythical Creatures, sharpen your CV’s and apply now.

Hackaday Prize Judge Elecia White Writes Tell-All Blog Post

The awarding of The Hackaday Prize is nearly upon us!  With just over a day left to go, Launch Judge Elecia White has decided to spill the beans and write a blog post about which of the five finalists she thinks should win. We don’t want to spoil the surprise… but what the heck, she wants them ALL to win.

ChipWhisperer because it brings high-end hardware security tools to the masses.

SatNOGS because it brings space to your back yard,

PortableSDR because of its great waterfall display,

ramanPi because come on, it’s a freaking spectrometer!

Open Source Science Tricorder because it uses sensors to help us see the science in the world around us.

Elecia knows how much time, effort, and passion went into these projects, and how each one embodies the open and connected spirit of The Hackaday Prize. Only one day remains before the big event in Munich, and the announcement of the winner.

Hackaday Prize Finalist: A Network of Satellite Ground Stations

There are astonishing things you can do with a network of sensors spread across the globe, all connected to the Internet. Thousands of people have already installed hardware to detect lightning and flightaware gives out subscriptions to their premium service to anyone who will listen in to airplane transponders and send data back to their servers. The folks behind SatNOGS, one of the five finalists for The Hackaday Prize are using this same crowdsourced data collection for something that is literally out of this world: listening to the ever-increasing number of amateur satellites orbiting the planet.

There are dozens of cubesats and other amateur satellites flying every year, and they have become an extremely popular way of experimenting in a space environment, giving some budding engineers an awesome project in school, and testing out some technologies that are just too weird for national space agencies. The problem with sending one of these birds up is getting the data back down; a satellite will pass above the horizon of a single location only a few times a day, and even then for only minutes at a time. The SatNOGS team hopes to change that by planting receivers all around the globe, connecting them to the Internet, and hopefully providing real-time telemetry from dozens of orbiting satellites.

[Pierros] from the SatNOGS team was kind enough to sit down and answer a few questions for us about his entry to The Hackaday Prize. That’s below, right after their finalist video. Some of the SatNOGS team will also be at our Munich event where we announce the winner of the Prize.

Continue reading “Hackaday Prize Finalist: A Network of Satellite Ground Stations”