DEFCON 22: Badge Talk

LosT_giving-badge-talk_defcon22

I got a great seat on the main floor for the first big DEFCON 22 talk which is a welcome to the con and discussion of the badge hardware. [LosT], the creator of this year’s badge, started the discussion with a teaser about the badge… there’s a phone number hidden as part of the challenge. [LosT] took a call from someone chasing the puzzles. The guy was in the audience which was pretty fun.

The process of building a puzzle that can be solved at DEFCON is really tough. How do you make it just hard enough that it won’t get pwned right away but easy enough that a large number of attendees will be able to figure it out during the weekend? The answer is to build a secure system and introduce strategic flaws which will be the attack vectors for the attendees solving the badge challenge.

defcon22-badge-cut-traces-to-remove-components

Of course the badge can be used as a development platform. The populated electronics on the board all have these nice little footprints which can be cut to disconnect them from the chip. The breakout headers on either side of the board allow you to connect headers for your own uses. Great idea!

defcon-22_badge-lanyard-glyphs

The back of the lanyards have special characters on them too. This encourages community at the conference. To solve the puzzle you need to find others with different lanyards. Compare the glyphs and crack the code (so far I have no clue!!).

Know what I’m doing wrong? Have suggestions on where to go from here? I’ll be checking the comments!

Call for Proposals: Hackaday 10th Anniversary

call-for-proposals

On October 4th Hackaday is celebrating our 10th anniversary. We’ll be hosting a live event in Pasadena that day which includes some hardware hacking, some workshops, a mini-conference, and a party. Details to follow on most of this, but we are putting out a call for proposals to those who would like to present a talk at the mini-conference. We plan to record the talks, workshops, and events so that those unable to attend can also enjoy the festivities.

The mini-conference will be about 3 hours long on the afternoon of Saturday, 10/4. We are looking for approximately four talks on topics interesting to the Hackaday community. These will be no more than 20-minutes in length with a short Q&A after.

In addition to the talks we will invite a limited number of hackers to give 7-minute lightning presentations on hardware projects they bring with them to the event.

Talk Proposals

Please email your proposal of no more than 350 words to conference -at- hackaday.com. Preference will be given to speakers who are able to be at the event in person. Exceptional presentations given via video-chat will also be considered. Talk proposals should be submitted before Friday, August 22nd. Please specify whether you will present in person or via video.

Hardware Project Lightning Talks

Please email your proposal of no more than 350 words to conference -at- hackaday.com. Your proposal should mention what stage of development/operation your hardware is currently in. Lighting talks must be presented in person.

 

Single servo robot

[Guilherme Martins] rose to a challenge to build a robot with a single servo. His robot is a puppet controller, called talkie walkie. In real time, it will move its mouth to the sound of what you are saying. For those really curious, he’s speaking Portuguese and he roughly says “Hi, how’s it going”. He’s using an Arduino with a custom sound sensor, a single servo, a box, and a folder paper mouth.

Building a single servo robot shouldn’t be that much of a challenge, we’ve even seen walking robots with a single motor. There’s this 2 legged crawler, and we recall seeing a 4 legged B.E.A.M. walker with a single servo, but can’t find it right now.

 

[via RobotsDreams]

 

Vocoding with a piano

0210_klavier1_n (Custom)

This really cool project allows a grand piano to “speak”.  We don’t know any details about its construction but we had to share. The keys are being hit by solenoids in a manner to replicate human speech.  Click through to the video, it’s worth it. You may have to allow the popup to see the video, and it is in german, but the piano is clearly speaking english. We want one to keep around the office. It could read our emails to us.

[via matrixsynth]

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