Hackaday Prize Entry: Dr. DAC

The theme of this year’s Hackaday Prize is. ‘build something that matters.’ A noble goal, but there’s also a second prize – the Best Product prize – that is giving $100k to one lucky team who can appeal to people with open jaws and wallets. It’s a fabulous prize that also includes a six month residency at the Hackaday Design Lab, but right now there aren’t many contenders for this part of The Hackaday Prize.

[drewrisinger]’s DrDAC USB Audio DAC is one of those project that’s in the running for the Best Product prize. He’s solving the problem of terrible low-quality built-in soundcards that seem to be everywhere. Yes, it’s a simple idea, but the execution is great.

The electronics for DrDAC are pretty much what you would expect for a DIY audio sound card; A PCM2706 takes USB audio and sends it out over I2S. A PCM1794 converts the I2S to analog audio, and an OPA2836  amplifies it and sends everything out through a 1/8″ jack or a pair of RCA plugs.

[drewrisinger] started DrDAC as a school project, and after receiving the PCBs, he noticed a problem. MultiSim’s footprint for a TQFP-32 package was too small, meaning the IC simply wouldn’t fit on the board. It was too late in the semester to order a new board, meaning some sort of rework needed to happen. [drew] fixed this problem by soldering jumper wires between the pads to the leads of the chip. Yes, it looks crazy, but apparently it works. You can check out a video of that whole process below.


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An Audio Based USB Oscilloscope and Signal Generator for $20

SoundScope

Are you interested in building a 20kHz 2-channel oscilloscope and a 2-channel signal generator for only $20 with minimal effort? Be sure to check out [Jan_Henrik’s] Instructable that goes over how to build this awesome tool from a cheap USB audio card.

We have featured tons and tons of DIY oscilloscopes in the past, but this effort resulted in something very well put together while remaining very simple to understand and easy to build. You don’t even need to modify the USB audio card at all. One of the coolest parts of this build is that you can unplug your probe assembly from your USB audio card, and bring it wherever your hacking takes you. After the build, all you need is [Christian Zeitnitz’s] Soundcard Oscilloscope program and you are good to go. One of the major downsides that is often overlooked when using an audio based oscilloscope, is that it is “AC coupled”. This means you cannot measure low-frequencies (including DC signals) using a sound card. Be sure to heed [Jan_Henrik’s] advice and do not use your built in audio card as an oscilloscope. With no protection circuitry, it is a sure fire way to fry your computer.

What analog projects have you built around an audio interface? We have seen such an interface used for many different applications, including a few fun medical related hacks (be sure to keep safety your first priority). Write in and let us know!