66% or better

Tearing down an ultrasound machine from 1963

hehsiemens

Vintage electronics are awesome, and old medical devices doubly so. When [Murtaugh] got his hands on an old ultrasound machine, he knew he had to tear it apart. Even if he wasn’t able to bring it back to a functional state, the components inside make for great history lesson fifty years after being manufactured.

This very primitive ultrasound machine was sold by Siemens beginning in 1963 as a, “diagnostic ultrasound unit for the quick evaluation of cerebral hemorrhage after accidents.” This is barely into the era of transistors and judging from [Murtaugh]‘s teardown, nearly the entire device is made of vacuum tubes, capacitors, and resistors.┬áThe only solid state component in this piece of equipment is a bridge rectifier found in the power supply. Impressive stuff, even today.

In the end, [Murtaugh] decided this device wasn’t worth repairing. There were cracks all the way through a PCB, and he didn’t have any of the strange proprietary accessories anyway. Still, this junkyard score netted [Murtaugh] a bunch of old tubes and other components, as well as a nifty CRT that came with a wonderful ‘Made in West Germany’ label,.

Comments

  1. Ginsublade says:

    It sure would make a nice crt clock…almost everything you need is probably in there already!!

  2. foxxpup says:

    It looks like the kind of thing Wallace and Gromit would encounter at the Moon. :-) Very cool case. I agree with Ginsublade, it would make a very nice crt clock.

  3. Uhh says:

    EEG ULtrasound

  4. pcf11 says:

    Vintage commercial electronics is the best stuff to scrap for parts because they have really nice components inside of them. They’re “the good stuff”

  5. Sven says:

    I like how he links to digitaltmuseum.no and says it’s in Swedish…

  6. That PCB makes me cringe. Single sided, no proper routing, components soldered onto the trace side, cables soldered “wherever”… kind of reminds me of the “PCBs” I used to make as a kid with cardboard and aluminum foil.
    And to think this was once considered not only customer electronics, but also medical equipment.

  7. Jimbo says:

    Looks good. Maybe you could make the most elaborate toaster of all time!

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