Storm Cloud Lamp Brings The Weather Inside

The humble lamp is a common build for a hacker looking to express themselves creatively. Often, nature can serve as an inspiration, as was the case for [Michael Pick]’s Storm Cloud. (Video, embedded below.)

Electronically, the build is straightforward, consisting of an Arduino Uno, an MP3 shield, and a string of WS2801 LEDs. These are driven slightly differently than the more-common WS2812B type, but Adafruit libraries make it easy for even the beginner. There’s also an RF keyfob fitted for remote control of the device, and a voice synth that serves as a user interface.

The video also covers the construction of the body of the lamp. Cardboard forms are created, then covered in tape to create a rough 3D ovaloid shape. This mold is then fiberglassed to create two shells, which are later joined together with bolts. This allows the LEDs and electronics to be neatly mounted inside. Spray adhesive is then used to affix what appears to be cotton wool or polyfill stuffing to the outside to create the cloud effect.

The final result is rather aesthetically pleasing. There’s the usual soft-glowing rainbows as you’d expect, but the real highlight is storm mode, which causes flickers of lighting to scatter across the surface of the cloud. The accompanying sound effects from the MP3 shield help add to the drama.

We’ve seen other takes on a cloud lamp before, too. Video after the break.

4 thoughts on “Storm Cloud Lamp Brings The Weather Inside

    1. The cloud just get’s fluffier, or you need to put it outside when real storms clouds pass over.

      We’ve seen cloud lamps before on hackaday, some indicate the weather which is a cool effect. I did not expect a talking cloud, interesting and fun project though. Though I feel a little sad about the looks of it, because the LED’s strips are very clearly visible which totally ruins the effect and therefore slightly ruins all the work that was put into it. So in essence it could use more diffusion or just more LED’s spread out evenly. Nonetheless a cool project.

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