Dungeon crawler game for IM-ME (and Linux)

[Joby Taffey] takes the prize for the first completed homebrew game for the IM-ME. Over the last few weeks we’ve seen [Travis Goodspeed] working with sprite graphics, and [Emmanuel Roussel] developing game music for the pink pager. But [Joby] didn’t really use either of those.

[Travis’] sprites were using a framebuffer that fills up a lot of valuable RAM. [Joby] decided to draw the room screens (all of them have been stitched together for the image above) as a one-time background image to keep the memory free. From there, the screen is updated in 8×8 blocks based on cursor movement. He also decided not to add music as he feels the high-pitched piezo is not capable making sound without driving everyone crazy.

Source code is available and for those of you who don’t own this pretty handheld, the game can also be compiled in Linux.

14 thoughts on “Dungeon crawler game for IM-ME (and Linux)

  1. My first playthrough of Doom was on a Compaq Contura 486dx without a sound card. The whole game was played with pc speaker sound effects. You get used to it.

  2. pilootgeeg

    a pc speaker on a motherboard is not the
    same as a piezo speaker

    piezo speaker is one metal disck found in a whatch whit alarm

  3. When I was working as a student helper doing desktop support at my University we had a few people who were constantly complaining about everything and causing 90% of the work load due mostly to their own ignorance and refusal to follow directions.

    One day I installed a little file on one of these peoples pc’s (an exe run from win.bat that then ran windows, the batch file was hidden in the dos path) This way if you looked at the autoexec.bat it would just look like it was loading windows, pre-win 95 days. It would randomly play a very high pitched noise from the pc speaker and only went off once every few hours for about 2 minuets.

    I would tell them “Sorry I can’t hear anything”, even if it was going off while I was working on their PC.

  4. @Akoi Meexx: Actually, most early PC speakers were real speakers. It was only later on when everyone had sound cards and the PC speaker was only needed for POST beeps that they changed to cheaper, smaller piezo speakers.

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