Kristin Paget is Hacking Carrier Grade LTE eNodeB

Every once in a while you get lucky and a piece of cool gear lands on your bench to tear down and explore. On that measuring stick, Kristin Paget hit the jackpot when she acquired a fascinating piece of current generation cellphone infrastructure. She’s currently researching a carrier-grade LTE eNodeB and walked through some of the findings, along with security findings of two IoT products, during her talk on the Laws of IoT Security at the 2017 Hackaday Superconference.

Evolved Node B (eNodeB) is the meat and potatoes of the LTE cellular network. It connects the antenna to backhaul — this is not something you’d expect to see on the open market but Kristin managed to pick one up from a vendor at DEF CON. Hearing her walk through the process of testing the hardware is a real treat in her talk and we’ll get to that in just a minute. But first, check out our video interview with Kristin the morning after her talk. We get into the progress of her eNodeB research, and touch on the state of IoT security with advice for hardware developers moving forward.

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Christine Sunu Proves the Effect of Being Alive on Hardware Design

Modeling machines off of biological patterns is the dry definition of biomimicry. For most people, this means the structure of robots and how they move, but Christine Sunu makes the argument that we should be thinking a lot more about how biomimicry has the power to make us feel something. Her talk at the 2017 Hackaday Superconference looks at what makes robots more than cold metal automatons. There is great power in designing to complement natural emotional reactions in humans — to make machines that feel alive.

We live in a world that is being filled with robots and increasingly these are breaking out of the confines of industrial automation to take a place side by side with humans. The key to making this work is to make robots that are recognizable as machines, yet intuitively accepted as being lifelike. It’s the buy-in that these robots are more than appliances, and Christine has boiled down the keys to unlocking these emotional reactions.

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HJWYDK: the Journal our Community Has Been Awaiting

We’re excited to announce the Hackaday Journal of What You Don’t Know. This will be a peer-reviewed journal of white papers that goes well beyond “look what I did” and will provide full design, data, and everything else needed to reproduce the most interesting things the engineering world has to offer. It’s a complete description of your knowledge offered up for the benefit of all.

Topics will include original and creative research, engineering, and entertainment in the areas of interest to the Hackaday community. These papers should embody original insight, experience, or discovery in any sufficiently challenging domain knowledge. This will be the manual for the things you need to know, but probably don’t. HJWYDK makes that knowledge freely available using the Open Access model for publications. It will be a journal without paywalls or frustration. It’s the journal you will reach for whenever you need to do something that feels impossible.

Useful information doesn’t just happen. It’s won through struggle and leads to unique knowledge. Have your accomplishments recognized at a higher level, and make sure they live on and are freely available.

All papers accepted by the editorial and review process will be immediately published online. They will also be printed in the annual Proceedings of the Hackaday Superconference, with the best submissions invited to present in person at the conference. Submit your papers now!

We are currently seeking Associate Editors and Peer Reviewers. Editors should send your background info to journal@hackaday.com. Reviewers should join the team on the HJWYDK project page and mention your areas of expertise in the join request.

Hackaday Store Discounts to Satiate the Shopping Urge

Score everything in the Hackaday store for 50% off right now.

Today is Thanksgiving in the United States, a time when people migrate back home to spend time with families, fill themselves with Turkey and cranberry sauce, and are inevitably dragged out to the big box stores in search for that one great deal to satisfy their consumer urge.

Whether you observe the holiday or not, you can grab some geeky stuff from the Hackaday Store without the early rise or the need to be in a specific place. You’ll find a collection of some of our favorite hardware, sweet Hackaday apparel, and our beloved print goods sprinkled in. Give it a look.

Facedancer21

Fly a quad indoors with the CrazyFlie 2.0, impersonate USB devices with the Facedancer21, and have a blast with our favorite clock kit, the Bulbdial Clock.

MeARM Pocket Sized Robot ArmGoodfet ProgrammerUSB Tester Bundle

Assemble and program your own robotic MeARM, be the master of all things serial bus with the GoodFET42, and monitor the juice flowing to your USB device with the USB Tester 2.0.

Hundreds of Tindie Items are also on sale this weekend. Tindie where you go to find unique and cutting edge hardware sold by those that designed it. Check out to the Tindie sale page for a complete listing of items going on sale now and throughout the weekend.

An Interview with Alex Williams, Grand Prize Winner

Alex Williams pulled off an incredible engineering project. He developed an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) which uses a buoyancy engine rather than propellers as its propulsion mechanism and made the entire project Open Source and Open Hardware.

The design aims to make extended duration missions a possibility by using very little power to move the vessel. What’s as remarkable as the project itself is that Alex made a goal for himself to document the project to the level that it is fully reproducible. His success in both of these areas is what makes the Open Source Underwater Glider the perfect Grand Prize winner for the 2017 Hackaday Prize.

We got to sit down with Alex the morning after he won to talk about the project and the path he took to get here.

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The Hacker Village of Supercon

I’m utterly exhausted and still in a state of awe. The Hackaday Superconference has grown in so many ways, but one thing remains the same: the spirit of the Hacker Village — an intangible feeling that grows up around all who attend — is bliss to take part in.

There’s really no substitute for having been there in person. I’ll go into detail below and try to share the experience as best I can. But the gist of the atmosphere is this: everyone at Supercon is the type of person you’d want to be stuck in a rowboat with, or partnered with on an engineering project, or to have next to you while trying to save the world. There are no looky-loos at Supercon. It turns out we are all stuck in a rowboat together, we are all working on engineering projects, and we are all trying to save the world. And when we all get together it feels like a drug our pragmatic minds never knew existed. This is the recharge for that sense of urgency that keeps you going all year long.

So yes, you really missed it. But start now. Become friends with all of these people over the next year. Begin building your Supercon community now and it’ll feel like a reunion when it rolls around again next November.

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Official Statement Regarding Counterfeit Benchoff Bucks

It was reported, and Hackaday has now confirmed, that counterfeit Benchoff Bucks were being circulated at this weekend’s Hackaday Superconference.

The fake bills were distinguishable by their poor printing quality and vastly smaller size than official ‘Bucks. Their appearance should help to relieve the skyrocketing value of the Benchoff Buck, whose dominance as the preferred paper currency at hardware conferences has caused deflationary forces to take hold as ‘Bucks holders hoard them.

Benchoff Nickel (contains no crypto)

Hackaday’s resident economists hope that the appearance of the counterfeits will begin to devalue the currency. Diminishing the strength of Benchoff Bucks has long been the goal for the portion of the Hackaday community who believe we need to move off of fiat Benchoff currency in favor of Benchoff-based cryptocurrency.

We anticipate seeing the long-rumored ICO early in 2018, likely in conjunction with other live Hackaday events. No word yet on the name of the new cryptocoins, but it is worth mentioning that the ‘Benchoff Nickel‘ has already been taken.

After an exhaustive investigation, the forger has been identified. They were given a pat on the back, a firm handshake, and charged with the responsibility of documenting the forgery effort as a Hackaday.io project. You know who you are… and we have our eye on you.

Stay tuned for reports on other shenanigans that took place at the Hackaday Superconference over the weekend. In the meantime, you can check out some of the epic talks that were live-streamed as they happened.