Bash Pipeline Puzzle: Green, Blue, or Blue Green?

[Marek Gibney] poses an interesting puzzle. What does the following bash command line print?

( echo red ; echo green 1>&2 ) | echo blue

You’d like to think it prints three lines: red, green, and blue. But would you be surprised to find out that it can sometimes output “blue green” and sometimes just output blue. The first surprise is that it isn’t deterministic. But the second thing that is surprising is the sometimes the entire left-hand part of the line doesn’t do anything. [Chris Siebenmann] did the analysis and explains what’s going on in a recent blog post.

Before you click the link or read further, you might want to see if you can deduce what’s going on. Give up? Here’s a hint: Part of the solution hinges on the fact that echo is built into the shell.

Continue reading “Bash Pipeline Puzzle: Green, Blue, or Blue Green?”

Command Line Utilities… in the Cloud?

Although many people think of Linux-based operating systems as graphical, really that GUI is just another application running over the bare operating system. Power users, remote administrators, and people running underpowered computers like a Raspberry Pi have a tendency to do more with command line tools. [Igor] did a FOSDEM19 presentation you can see below about how he’s providing web-like services to the command line using web servers and curl as a client.

This is subtly different from just accessing an ordinary web server via curl. The output is meant for display in the terminal. Of course, you could also hit them with a web browser, if you wanted — at least, for some of them. [Igor’s] tools include a weather reporter, a QR code encoder, information and graphs for currency and cybercurrency rates, and an online help system for programmers.

Continue reading “Command Line Utilities… in the Cloud?”

Learn About BGP With The Internet Of EvE

When we first saw [Ben Jojo’s] post about the Internet inside EvE Online, we didn’t think we’d be that interested. We don’t play EvE — a massively multiplayer game. But it turns out, the post is really about understanding BGP (Border Gateway Protocol) and how it helps route traffic in large networks. The best part? He actually simulates a network with 8,000 nodes to test out what he’s talking about.

Obviously, you wouldn’t want to fire up 8,000 Raspberry Pi computers for such an experiment. Using Buildroot, he set up a very small Linux image that had the bare minimum required to run the tests. The qemu provided virtualization, including an obscure feature that allows you to transfer data between virtual machines using UDP. The whole thing ran on some pretty beefy hardware in the cloud. Sure, you could have provisioned 8,000 cloud instances, but that would run into some serious money pretty fast, we imagine. As a wrap-up, he even uses BGP to model his local mass transit system.

Continue reading “Learn About BGP With The Internet Of EvE”

This Tiny Router Could be the Next Big Thing

It seems like only yesterday that the Linksys WRT54G and the various open source firmware replacements for it were the pinnacle of home router hacking. But like everything else, routers have gotten smaller and faster over the last few years. The software we run on them has also gotten more advanced, and at this point we’ve got routers that you could use as a light duty Linux desktop in a pinch.

But even with no shortage of pocket-sized Linux devices in our lives, the GL-USB150 “Microrouter” that [Mason Taylor] recently brought to our attention is hard to ignore. Inside this USB flash drive sized router is a 400 MHz Qualcomm QCA9331 SoC, 64 MB of RAM, and a healthy 16 MB of storage; all for around $20 USD. Oh, and did we mention it comes with OpenWRT pre-installed? Just plug it in, and you’ve got a tiny WiFi enabled Linux computer ready to do your bidding.

On his blog [Mason] gives a quick rundown on how to get started with the GL-USB150, and details some of the experiments he’s been doing with it as part of his security research, such as using the device as a remote source for Wireshark running on his desktop. He explains that the diminutive router works just fine when plugged into a USB battery bank, offering a very discreet way to deploy a small Linux box wherever you may need it. But when plugged into a computer, things get really interesting.

If you plug the GL-USB150 into a computer, it shows up to the operating system as a USB Ethernet adapter and can be used as the primary Internet connection. All of the traffic from the computer will then be routed through the device to whatever link to the Internet its been configured to use. Depending on how you look at it, this could be extremely useful or extremely dangerous.

For one, it means that something that looks all the world like a normal USB flash drive could be covertly plugged into a computer and become a “wiretap” through which all of the network traffic is routed. That’s the bad news. On the flip side, it also means you could configure the GL-USB150 as a secure endpoint that lets you quickly and easily funnel all the computer’s traffic through a VPN or Tor without any additional setup.

We’ve seen all manner of hacks and projects that made use of small Linux-compatible routers such as the TP-Link TL-MR3020, but we expect the GL-USB150 and devices like it will be the ones to beat going forward. Let’s just hope one of them doesn’t show up uninvited in your network closet.

Linux Fu: Easier File Watching

In an earlier installment of Linux Fu, I mentioned how you can use inotifywait to efficiently watch for file system changes. The comments had a lot of alternative ways to do the same job, which is great. But there was one very easy-to-use tool that didn’t show up, so I wanted to talk about it. That tool is entr. It isn’t as versatile, but it is easy to use and covers a lot of common use cases where you want some action to occur when a file changes.

Continue reading “Linux Fu: Easier File Watching”

Linux Fu: The Kitchen Sync

One of the great things about Linux and similar operating systems is they are configurable. If you don’t like something, there’s a great chance you can change it easily with a few entries in a file somewhere. For example, take bash — a very popular shell by any measure. If you want a different style of command line editing, there’s an option. You want the tab key to match files regardless of case? Another option. Usually, these are set in one of your so-called profile files like .bashrc in your home directory.

As long as you are sitting in front of your single computer working, this is great. You customize your .bashrc and other files to your heart’s content and then you work in an environment that acts the way you want it to. The problem is when you have a lot of computers. Maybe you have a web server, a desktop, a firewall machine, and a few dozen Raspberry Pi computers. How do you keep all the configurations the same? Then once they are the same, how do you keep them up to date?

Continue reading “Linux Fu: The Kitchen Sync”

Linux Fu: Share Terminal in Browser

The title of this post says it all: GoTTY is a program that lets you share Linux terminal applications into a web browser. It is a simple web server written in Go that runs a non-GUI program and can push it out a socket in such a way that a browser can display it and, optionally, let the user interact with it.

With the emphasis on security these days, that ought to alarm you. After all, why would you want a shell running in a browser? Hang on, though. While that is possible — and not always undesirable — the real value to this technique is to run a specific command line program in a browser window. Here’s a use case: You want users to remotely monitor a system using top (or htop, if you are fancy). But you don’t want users logging into the system nor do you want to require them to have ssh clients. You don’t want to install monitoring tools, just use what you already have.

If you could get the output from top to show up in a browser window — even if the users had no ability to input — that would be an easy solution. Granted, you could just run top in batch mode, collect the output, and write it somewhere that a web server could find it. Assuming you have a web server installed, of course. But then what if you did want some other features like taking command line options or having the option for (hopefully) authenticated users to interact with the software? Now that would be more complicated. With GoTTY, it is easy.

Continue reading “Linux Fu: Share Terminal in Browser”