Frozen Rat Kidney Shipping Container

The biggest allure of 3D printing, to us at least, is the ability to make hyper-personalized objects that would otherwise fall through the cracks of our mass-market economy. Take, for instance, the Frozen Rat Kidney Shipping Container, or maybe some of the less bizarro applications in the US National Institute of Health’s 3D Print Exchange.

The Exchange is dominated, at least in terms of sheer numbers, by 3D models of proteins and other biochemical structures. But there are two sections that will appeal to the hacker in you: prosthetics and lab equipment. Indeed, we were sent there after finding a nice model of a tray-agitator that we wanted to use for PCB etching. We haven’t printed one yet, but check out this flexible micropositioner.

While it’s nowhere near as comprehensive a resource as some other 3D printing model sites, the focus on 3D printing for science labs should really help those who have that particular itch to find exactly the right scratcher. Or a tailor-made flexible container for slicing frozen rat kidneys. Whatever you’re into. We don’t judge.

Man with skull image: [jaqtikkun]

6 thoughts on “Frozen Rat Kidney Shipping Container

  1. “The biggest allure of 3D printing, to us at least, is the ability to make hyper-personalized objects that would otherwise fall through the cracks of our mass-market economy. ”

    I think it was Future Shock that told us we would have on-demand manufacture. Customization to a T, and counterfeiting and piracy greatly reduced because the products would be tied so closely to their owner.

  2. 3D printing is great, I own one myself but often a subtractive manufacturing combined with tougher materials is a much better option. Also for larger parts a cnc (mill, router, lathe etc) is much more convenient and faster to produce parts. Since I own a cnc I don’t nearly print as much, though some upgrades to the cnc were 3D printed. I’m planning to do the reverse though too, build a new 3D printer using the cnc.

  3. It’s not just rats. They seem to have it in for zebra finches, too. They have an anesthesia mask specifically for those birds, and a couple different blade guides that are essentially “miter boxes” for slicing their brains into wafers. They also have mouse grabbers and mouse goggles.

    I don’t think I’d want to be an animal anywhere near their labs.

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