Homemade Bokode

We’ve recently been getting a lot of new comments on our Bokode post from a while back, and with good reason.  [M@] has managed to find a way to replicate Bokode at home, using $0 worth of equipment (before the price of microprint). To accomplish Bokode at home, it seems all you need is and old webcam lens assembly and an LED.  Of course the his version is not as thin as a regular barcode so it probably wont be replacing anything in the near future, but the concept of from MIT to home within such a short period of time is amazing.

Comments

  1. Hackius says:

    70$ to make the microprint

    yeeeouch!

  2. medix says:

    250 um is still pretty big. I think I could re-print this into a glass microscope slide and reduce the feature size by at least an order of magnitude. Methinks I’ve got an idea..

  3. M@ says:

    @medix
    I would love to hear how to do it. it would increase the effective range of the unit hugely.

  4. medix says:

    Using an ultrafast laser. Effective focal spot cross section is on the order of a few microns at 800 nm and a 40x aspheric objective. I’ll have to wait until our new equipment comes in (probably several months out)

  5. Concino says:

    We now need a scanner of some sort to read the Bocode, no?
    How high quality the camera has to be in order for this to work?

  6. T Ferguson says:

    From TFA: “Essentially you need a decent digital camera to make it work.” This is because the effect doesn’t work with any but the largest camera aperture sizes. Doesn’t this limit the utility of the technology if it doesn’t work with cameraphones, webcams, or point+shoots?

  7. M@ says:

    @concino
    I’ve been playing with a Processing library to try and pull data back out of the system. It shouldn’t be intensely difficult but I’m not the world’s foremost programming genius. I’m probably not even in the list of the top one million programming geniuses.

    How well the effect appears actually is a function of aperture size not really camera quality, though better usually means bigger. I got the effect pretty strongly with a little Cannon PowerShot.

    @TFerguson
    No question it limits the accessibility. Pretty much if the camera’s max aperture is under 25cm there’s not much happening. If the pattern size could be decreased substantially (like an order of magnitude) there’s a chance of getting some reading from a cameraphone, though the bokeh effect you’d get would be pretty narrow.

  8. Wwhat says:

    Uses µm for the description of the bokode but the building diagram pdf is half in metric and half in inches, a bit weird that.

  9. William says:

    Doesn’t it look eerily like the character from “V for Vendetta”?

  10. Frogz says:
  11. Bokodes can theoretically be read from up to 60m away although I guess that won’t be true for the passie version, I think this will become commonly used technology, there’s more info available here – http://www.bokodes.org

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