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Reverse engineering the PSP

The original PSP may be old news but there is an interesting relic of a website (translated) dedicated to the reverse engineering of a PSP (and exploring Saturn?). To determine the true capabilities of the PSP they desoldered most of the ball grid array chips and then hand soldered 157 jumper wires to allow for direct memory access. In later pictures it shows the PSP hooked up to external hardware for on the fly memory modification. Unfortunately the details are sparse and it doesn’t appear as if they will be updated anytime soon because the website has been “deleted and freezed because of spam. may ineffaceable curse prevail on the spammers.” Still this doesn’t detract too much some very impressive soldering.

Comments

  1. iToast says:

    Even thought im sick of the horrible administration here, ima say this. This is kinda pointles… Since we can read and write to all hardware throught a kernel exploit.

  2. andrew says:

    I’m guessing this was done before that was possible.

  3. iToast says:

    @andrew homebrew was out before this, psps OFW 1.0 allowed homebrew… Proding and poking of the hardware through homebrew… it was insecure

  4. Alex says:

    @iToast:

    What you are seeing is one way those kernel exploits were developed. These are the guys who do the real work. So unless you have something useful to add, get over it.

  5. addidis says:

    This is a glimpse into what sony used to be. A company who literally sent pre-release psp to the hackers doing this stuff. They used the communities code, and added the functionality the community added to OFW. It was a good time to own a psp.
    Now rather then free hardware , they send court summons. It makes me sad.

  6. arfink says:

    Holy cow, now that’s some amazing soldering. O.o

  7. Robert Ely says:

    @iToast;

    REALLY? If your not posting useless crap in the forums, your hating in the forums? If you dont like the site, GTFO….I can easily speak for every one when i say, I’m fucking tired of you…

  8. iToast says:

    @alex Seriosly? The kernel exploits started with buffer overflows. Unused signing. Yes, they did somthing like this, dark_alex did. But HENS were released that didnt need the hardware hacking EVER. And this meathod was stoped. Now its based off kernel hacks.

  9. Gilliam says:

    toasty, i will diverge from topic as well; take a deep breath and put on a shit-eating smile. it will help you get through the day :)

    on topic: that chip looks like a monkey brain with all those wires coming out of it.

  10. strider_mt2k says:

    I really didn’t appreciate the PSP until it was properly hacked.
    I don’t play mine all the time, but I keep it well taken care of and still use it occasionally.

    It’s because of pioneers like these we can take these things for granted.

    I salute you!

  11. Jim Atchue says:

    @iToast

    This is how all the exploits came to be, these are the real workers. Stop your bitching.

    @everyone else

    If you need me to translate any specific part of this website let me know, I will be glad to translate it. Just put the page url in a comment.

  12. anon says:

    Nem and his group Saturn Expedition Committee were the ones who did all this stuff back in 2004. Their efforts paid off and were the first to run a Hello World application on the PSP on firmware 1.0.

  13. anon says:

    Oops, meant 2005.

  14. charliex says:

    its pretty epic work regardless of the age. i’ve hand soldered wires to chips like this to do RE , its a lot of work.

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