PCB Art Becomes Lapel Pins

We’re now living in the golden age of PCB art. Over the last year or so, the community has learned to manipulate silk screen, copper, and solder mask layers into amazing pieces of craftsmanship. These boards are putting the ‘A’ in STEAM, and now we have fiberglass replacements for enamel lapel pins.

[jglim] didn’t have much experience with fabric, but a PCB lapel pin was something that seemed like it should work. There are really only three parts to a lapel pin — the small ornamental pin itself, a solderable spike somehow attached to the pin (usually by soldering), and a clasp that holds the pin steadfastly to a lapel. The spike and clasp assembly were easily sourced on AliExpress, with one hundred clasps available for seven dollerydoos.  Attaching the spike to the PCB was as simple as adding a circular copper pad on the obverse side, applying some solder, and the liberal application of toaster ovens.

The design of the pin was based on the HTML5 logo, with the actual art done in Photoshop using a palette picked from OSHPark’s preview colors. The four colors used in this design are bare copper, a light purple for mask over copper, a darker purple for mask without copper, and a pale yellow for exposed FR4. This design was imported into KiCad with the Bitmap2Component tool.

The assembly of these lapel pins went very easily, and the finished product looks great. There’s a lot you can do with the standard OSHPark color stackup like making money of me, and this is a great example of exactly how much you can do with PCB art.

23 thoughts on “PCB Art Becomes Lapel Pins

    1. -1000 ! The ‘A’ is for a**holes, because nowadays “Art” is for lazy and ignorant opportunistic bullshitters who are just after easy (pulbic) money with a swagger, and their low tragically harm Fine Arts as well as popular arts in the long run. So please be done with that and go mess with another community and blog (name it “CRAP-a-Day”, it has an ‘A’ in it, so you should be fine).

      Now I propose a petition demanding Benchoff’s resignation from Hackaday, moral will assuredly improve through the roof immediatly after he quits and stops continually shoving that ridiculous, buzzword-wannabe, acronym down our throat at last, among his other shameless cynical manners and his inflated poor writings.

      1. You do realize how funny this is, right?

        Just take a step back here. Just for a second. The only thing I have to do to get people calling for my dismissal is say, “the ‘A’ stands for ‘Arts'”. That’s it. Nothing else, and the comments are filled with calls for me to be fired.

        This is hilarious. This is humor on a level I’ve never experienced before. It’s like Kaufman playing Carnegie Hall here. This is playing the dozens with Oscar Wilde. It’s people watching with Mark Twain.

        The only downside to your reaction is that now I can’t overuse this joke.

        1. He also mentioned your poor writing skills, such as using “obverse” (to sound smart), when you should have used “reverse”. If only you put as much work into your articles as you do into the disparaging replies to legitimate criticisms in the comment section…

    2. There are sooo many things I do not like about this project, like the wrong software tools for the graphics part (to start with). This is especially true given there are far better/appropriate tools available as FOSS. (Yes these FOSS tools are all cross-platform these days, so the “A” people do NOT need to live in Apple’s Photo$hop jail anymore!) I guess we’ll see a lot more of this nonsense now that there’s a totally inappropriate “A” in “STEAM” [insert Sad-Face here]

      1. Correction, Photo$hop is NOT an Apple product – it is an Adobe Systems product. But we see a (IMO purely) ideologically-driven adoption of Adobe’s products by users of Apple’s products.

  1. Is there a quick or economical method for smoothing the edges? They look rather sharp. Maybe just lightly sand them?

    Here is how traditional lapel pins are made, for reference.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s