Hackaday Podcast 174: Breaking Into The Nest, The Cheapest 3D Printer, A Spy In Your HDMI, And AI All Over The Place

Fresh from vacation, Editor-in-Chief Elliot Williams makes his triumphant return to the Hackaday Podcast! He’s joined this week by Managing Editor Tom Nardi, who’s just happy he didn’t have to do the whole thing by himself again. In this episode we’ll talk about tackling BGA components in your custom PCBs, a particularly well executed hack against Google’s Nest Hub, and why you probably don’t really want the world’s cheapest 3D printer. We’ll also take a look at an incredible project to turn the Nokia 1680 into a Linux-powered handheld computer, a first of its kind HDMI firewall, and a robot that’s pretty good at making tacos. Listeners who are into artificial intelligence will be in for quite a treat as well, as is anyone who dreams of elevating the lowly automotive alternator to a more prominent position in the hacker world.

By the way, it seems nobody has figured out the hidden message in last week’s podcast yet. What are you waiting for? One of you out there has to be bored enough to give it a shot.

Direct download, and play it offline. You don’t need no stinkin’ cloud.

Check out the links below if you want to follow along, and as always, tell us what you think about this episode in the comments!

Episode 174 Show Notes:

Interesting Hacks of the Week:

Quick Hacks:

Can’t-Miss Articles:

2 thoughts on “Hackaday Podcast 174: Breaking Into The Nest, The Cheapest 3D Printer, A Spy In Your HDMI, And AI All Over The Place

  1. The HDMI standard is all over the hackerspace. HDMI 2.1b allows ethernet over the cable. Ethernet is in interesting attack vector.

    https://www.hdmi.org/download/savefile?bucket=hdmi-web-public&fileKey=Specifications/1dot4_feature_archive.pdf

    I remember reading about an extension to the HDMI standard called HDCP which was supposed to help with “hackers”. I remember reading on some web site about people trying to get keys for that silly standard, and how terrible it was.

    https://hackaday.com/2013/02/18/hdmi-breakout-lets-you-sniff-hdcp-crypto-keys/

    https://hackaday.com/2011/11/30/hdcp-falls-to-fpga-based-man-in-the-middle-attack/

    https://hackaday.com/2010/09/24/the-hdcp-master-key/

    https://hackaday.com/2009/10/01/tv-hack-bypasses-hdcp/

    So yea, the folks who work on HDMI think about new uses and capabilities, they are just really bad at it.

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