Hackaday Podcast 094: Fake Sun, Hacked Super Mario, Minimum Viable Smart Glasses, And 3D Printers Can’t Do That

Hackaday editors Elliot Williams and Mike Szczys traverse the hackerscape looking for the best the internet had to offer last week. Nintendo has released the new Game & Watch handheld and it’s already been hacked to run custom code. Heading into the darkness of winter, this artificial sun build is one not to miss… and a great way to reuse a junk satellite dish. We’ve found a pair of smartglasses that are just our level of dumb. And Tom Nardi cracks open some consumer electronics to find a familiar single-board computer doing “network security”.

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Hackaday Podcast 093: Hot And Fast Raspberry Pi, Dr. Seuss Drone, M&M Mass Meter, And FPGA Tape Backup

Hackaday editors Mike Szczys and Elliot Williams wrangle the epic hacks that crossed our screens this week. Elliot ran deep on overclocking all three flavors of the Raspberry Pi 4 this week and discovered that heat sinks rule the day. Mike exposes his deep love of candy-coated chocolates while drooling over a machine that can detect when the legume is missing from a peanut M&M. Core memory is so much more fun when LEDs come to play, one tiny wheel is the power-saving secret for a very strange multirotor drone, and there’s more value in audio cassette data transfer than you might think — let this FPGA show you how it’s done.

Take a look at the links below if you want to follow along, and as always, tell us what you think about this episode in the comments!

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Hackaday Podcast 092: Orbital Data By Mail, Human Flight On Styrofoam Wings, And Seven Shades Of E-Ink

Hackaday editors Elliot Williams and Mike Szczys catch the best hacks you may have missed. This week we look at the new Raspberry Pi 400, use computer vision to get ready for geeky Christmas, and decypher a negative-space calendar. We get an answer to the question of what happens if you scale up a styrofoam airplane to human-size. Facebook is locking down VR headset, will hackers break them free? And take an excellent stroll down memory lane to find out what it was like to be a space-obsessed ham at the dawn of personal computers.

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Hackaday Podcast 091: Louisville Exploder, Generating Japanese Joinery, Relay Retrocomputer Rally, And Chop The Robopup

Hackaday editors Mike Szczys and Elliot Williams dig through the greatest hacks that ought not be missed this week. There’s a wild one that flexes engineering skills instead of muscles to beat the homerun distance record with an explosively charged bat. A more elegant use of those engineering chops is shown in a CNC software tool that produces intricate wood joinery without needing an overly fancy machine to fabricate it. If your flesh and blood pets aren’t keeping up with your interests, there’s a new robot dog on the scene that far outperforms its constituent parts which are 3D-printed and of the Pi and Arduino varieties. And just when you thought you’d seen all the craziest retrocomputers, here’s an electromechanical relay based machine that took six years to build (although there’s so much going on here that it should have taken sixteen).

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Hackaday Podcast 090: DIY Linux SBC, HDMI CEC, Fake Bluepills, And SCARA Arms

Hackaday editors Elliot Williams and Mike Szczys chat about our favourite hacks from the past week. We start off with a bit of news of the Bennu asteroid and the new Raspberry Pi Compute Module. We drive ourselves crazy trying to understand how bobbin holders on sewing machines work, all while drooling over the mechanical brilliance of a bobbin-winding build. SCARA is the belt and pulley champion of robot arms and this week’s example cleverly uses redundant bearings for better precision. And we wrap up the show looking in on longform articles about the peppering of microcontrollers found on the Bluepill and wondering what breakthroughs are left to be found for internal combustion.

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Hackaday Podcast 089: 770 Potato Battery, Printing Resin Resist, And No-Internet Video Chat

Hackaday editors Mike Szczys and Elliot Williams weigh the hacking gold found across the internet this week. We can’t get over the epic adventure that went into making a battery from 100 pounds of potatoes. It turns out you don’t need Internet for video conferencing as long as you’re within a coupe of kilometers of everyone else. And move over toner transfer method, resin printers want a shot at at-home PCB etching. We’ll take a look at what the Tesla selfie cam is doing under the hood, and lose our marbles over a ball-bearing segment clock that’s defying gravity.

Take a look at the links below if you want to follow along, and as always, tell us what you think about this episode in the comments!

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Hackaday Podcast 088: Flywheel Trebuchet, Thieving Magpies, Hero Engines, And Hypermiling

Hackaday editors Elliot Williams and Mike Szczys riff on the hardware hacks that took the Internet by storm this week. Machining siege weapons out of aluminum? If they can throw a tennis ball at 180 mph, yes please! Welding aficionados will love to see the Hero Engine come together. We dive into the high-efficiency game of hypermiling, and spin up the polarizing topic of the Sun Cycle. The episode wouldn’t be complete without hearing what the game of Go sounds like as a loop sequencer, and how a variable speed cassette player can be abused for the benefit of MIDI lovers the world over.

Take a look at the links below if you want to follow along, and as always, tell us what you think about this episode in the comments!

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