Decatron stand-in

Think the swirling glow of a Decatron is cool but don’t want to deal with the voltage issues? [Osgeld] sidestepped the problem by developing a fake Decatron. Admiral Nelson (Captain Morgan’s cheaper cousin) provided the enclosure in the form of an airplane sized liquor bottle. The LEDs are common-something (not sure if it’s anode or cathode) so they end up being individually addressable through the mess of wires coming out the end. This will greatly simplify that kitchen timer we’ve been meaning to build. See the blinking lights go around and around after the break.

Comments

  1. Mike says:

    Since Hackaday now has a working video in the post, I’ll be removing my version.

  2. ManBearPig says:

    @Caleb Kraft

    I’d like some clarification on this @Osgeld thing myself. I have long supported and promoted Hackaday. I love this site.

    On the other hand, if it isn’t made clear that we retain the rights to the things we build/construct/hack/publish (and if Osgeld doesn’t get his apology) then I’m done with Hackaday.

    I’m totally serial.

    • Caleb Kraft says:

      @ManBearPig,
      Osgeld has gotten his apology from me. I don’t know if he’ll pursue it beyond that. It would probably not be worth his time.

      I am working on getting a “terms of service” together for hackaday that says very clearly that you own your stuff.

  3. ehrichweiss says:

    Regulus, no, it IS a big deal regardless whether it’s a video of a real perpetual motion machine, or some ripples in the water; you should not be able to take someone else’s content down and attempt to claim copyright on it simply because you heard your little brother’s name mentioned and thought “zomg, nobody but me uses his name so this must be my video! Destroy those who stole it from me!”.

  4. osgeld says:

    looks like a winner, now there is no question in the future

  5. janin says:

    Thanks for clarifying this. I had cold sweat when I realized you were connected with these guys. I assume the policy does not apply to answers.hackaday.com, however.

  6. mjrippe says:

    @joscience

    Yes, “Dekatron” was the name used by ETL, but it has also become the generic name for cold cathode counting tubes. While “decatron” is an acceptable alternate spelling, it is used infrequently and usually by those unacquainted with these tubes. I have been interested in dekatrons for years and am quite familiar with their use and history. So think twice before you claim someone has no idea what they are talking about, smartass.

  7. Simon Chester says:

    Sorry, I made a mistake. According to Caleb Kraft, it’s actually owned by the founder of Mahalo, Jason Calacanis.

    So, it’s sort of a sister company to Mahalo.

    For more info see: http://answers.hackaday.com/who-owns-hackaday

  8. Mikey says:

    As for this project… it’s leds in an airplane alcohol bottle, yeah? um, alright then…

    @Caleb Kraft you’re a badass, but still I totally get where @osgeld is coming from here; if it was my stuff I’d be pissed too. Thanks for putting up the TOS.

    @Osgeld, I hope you get that apology.

  9. draeath says:

    @ Mikey

    What makes it special is that it’s a TTL-level “clone” of these: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decatron

    It’s not ‘just’ blinkin’ LEDs, but that they are replacing this old tube device.

  10. Mikey says:

    umm don’t they already have TTL level replacements for those… that don’t light up and are smaller (on an IC), and are faster? Isn’t this just that, but with LEDs on it?

    Meh. Kind of cool I guess if you’re going for nostalgia.

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