Seeing with another person’s eyes

We suppose they could just trade shoes, but that wouldn’t be a hack. [Timothy] wanted to design a team-building exercise at work, and he figured the best way to get some empathy would be to have people swap eyes. He calls his project eyeSwap and it is supposed to, “put the eye back in team.”

[Tim] found a few CRT viewfinders in a junk box attached small video cameras to each one. During the ‘training phase’ of his team-building exercises, both people playing the game complete a few hand-eye coordination tasks to get a feel for the rig. After the training phase, the inputs are swapped; Alice’s cameras are sent to Bob’s viewfinders and vice versa. The participants then complete the same tasks they did during the training phase.

The tasks aren’t that hard – putting balls into holes, for example – but it does require a huge amount of communication and coordination. eyeSwap reportedly builds trust and empathy towards others, and looks like a lot more fun than a ‘trust fall.’

Check out the video of two people playing eyeSwap after the break.

Comments

  1. Wouter says:

    Almost the ‘point of view gun’ out of the HitchHikers Guide to the Galaxy movie. Brilliant idea :D. You could start a team building firm with a few sets of these.

  2. monkeyslayer56 says:

    hmmm could they be used in some way to build faith with faith plates?

  3. Random UB Student says:

    I found it nice to realize after seeing the picture that Tim showed us this project in class last week. Grats on the HAD spot.

  4. Stoffel says:

    This remembers me the guy with the camera over his head so he was able to see himself from above.
    Cannot find it any more, maybe somebody knows it.

  5. wardy says:

    I think this would make me throw up. Sufferers of motion sickness might not be keen on it.

    It’s interesting how the concious brain can override the low-level hard wiring for things like sight and coordination.

  6. munkFachnine says:

    Some interesting experiments have been done using this sort of setup. Check out Lorimer Moseley’s recent talk about how your brain perceives pain at
    .

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