Popular Printers Pwned In Prodigious Page Prank

A new day dawns, and we have another story involving insecure networked devices. This time it is printers of all makes and descriptions that are causing the panic, as people are finding mystery printouts bearing messages such as this:

Stackoverflowin has returned to his glory, your printer is part of a botnet, the god has returned

Well that’s it then, you can’t argue with a deity, especially one who has apparently created a botnet from the world’s printing devices. Printer owners the world over are naturally worried about their unexpected arrival, and have appeared on support forums and the like to express their concern.

We are of course used to taking everything our printers tell us at face value. Low on ink? I hear you, my inanimate reprographic friend! But when our printer tells us it’s part of a botnet perhaps it’s time to have a little think. It is entirely possible that someone could assemble a botnet of compromised printers, but in this case we smell a rat. Only in farcical crime dramas do crooks announce their crimes in such a theatrical fashion, you might say it’s the point of a botnet not to be detected by its host. Reading some of the reports it seems that many of the affected systems have port 9100 open to the world, that’s the standard TCP printer port, so it seems much more likely that someone has written a little script that looks for IP addresses with port 9100 open, and trolls them with this message.

The real message here is one with which we expect Hackaday readers will be very familiar, and which we’ve covered before. Many network connected appliances have scant regard for security, and are a relative push-over for an attacker. The solution is relatively straightforward to those of a technical inclination, be aware of which services the devices is exposing, lock down services such as uPNP and close any open ports on your router. Unfortunately these steps are probably beyond many home users, whose routers remain with their default manufacturer’s settings for their entire lives. It’s a shame our printer troll didn’t add a link to basic router security tips.

If you want to have a little fun, some of the printed pages include an email address for ‘the god’. It would be fun to figure out who this is, right?

Botnet attack via P2P software


P2P networks have long been a legal gray area, used for various spam schemes, illegal filesharing, and lots and lots of adware. Last year, though, the first botnet created by a worm distributed via P2P software surfaced, the work of 19-year-old [Jason Michael Milmont] of Cheyenne, Wyoming, who distributed his Nugache Worm by offering free downloads of the P2P app Limewire with the worm embedded. He later began distributing it using bogus MySpace and Photobucket links shared via chats on AOL Instant Messenger. The strategy proved effective, as the botnet peaked with around 15,000 bots. [Milmont] has plead guilty to the charges against him. Per his plea agreement, he will pay $73,000 in restitution and may serve up to five years in prison.