Build an In Line Network Bandwidth Monitor

[Kurt] likes to know what’s going on with his network. He already uses bandwidth checking software on his DD-WRT capable router, but he wanted a second opinion. So he built his own network monitor. [Kurt] started by building a passive Ethernet tap. He then needed a network interface chip that would serve his purposes. The common Wiznet chips used with Arduinos didn’t allow enough manipulation of raw packet data, so he switched to a Microchip ENC624J600 (PDF). The Microchip controller allowed him to count the bytes in the raw Ethernet packets.

With the Ethernet interface complete, [Kurt] turned his attention to a microcontroller to run the show. He started with an Arduino, but the lack of debugging quickly sent him to an Atmega128 in Atmel Studio. After getting the basic circuit working, [Kurt] switched over to a PIC24F chip. With data finally coming out of the circuit, he was able to tell that his original back-of-the-napkin calculations for bandwidth were wrong. [Kurt] created a PCB to hold the microcontroller, then wrote a Python program to plot the data output from his circuit. The bandwidth plot matched up well with the plot from DD-WRT. Now he just needs a giant LED matrix to show off his current network stats!

SNESoIP: It’s exactly what it sounds like

prototype-small

Here’s a cool hack for those of you wishing to play some retro multiplayer SNES games online!

[Michael Fitzmayer] is a resident hacker at shackspace; der hackerspace in StuttgartHe’s come up with this clever little ethernet adapter network-bridge that can share local controller-inputs over the internet. The entire project is open-source, and readily available on github. It’s still in the early stage of development, but it is already fully functional. The firmware is small and will fit on an ATmega8, and by the looks of the component list it’s a fairly easy build.

He’s even integrated a switch mode (hold B and Y during boot), which avoids trying to figure out which controller will be player one! After all, don’t you remember untangling the controller cords, trying to figure out which one is which?

We know you had a favorite controller and would give the other “crappy” one to your guest.

Example video is after the break.

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