9 thoughts on “Hackaday Prize Entry: A Bracelet for the Blind

  1. Was this tested with a blind person? How is it better than traditional white cane? I have a white cane, I learned to use it when I was 5 (my mom was afraid I’ll be blind because of glaucoma, so she wanted to prepare me). With white cane one can detect obstacles that are in front, on the sides, it shows, where are doors while going down a corridor or sidewalk, detects steps going up and down, streetlamps, curbs, fences or low walls, road signs, etc., and other people. Can this sonar do the same and is it cheaper than piece of pipe painted white?

    1. Indeed, what users need it a good interface for their smart-phones that doesn’t interfere with their other senses in traffic.

      I have seen guys counting menu clicks in public trying to navigate their phone, and text-to-speech is not user friendly at all if you can’t hear it over the traffic.

      Anyone know how far the 3d printed brail-display people progressed?

  2. While I applaud the creator for going down this route, I have to say be careful as lots of other people have done similar implementations and failed in terms of gaining acceptance or having a large of an impact as they had hoped for. There is at least one engineering capstone project using sensors to help the blind almost every year at most universities. It may be worthwhile hitting them up and asking why they their implementation did not readily appeal/seem worthwhile in their target population.

    https://www.fastcompany.com/3038963/can-this-bracelet-help-the-blind-better-understand-their-surroundings

    https://www.usnews.com/news/stem-solutions/articles/2015/01/06/example-of-campus-innovations-bat-signal-for-blind

  3. I’m not sure how old this project is, but the new TimeOfFlight laser modules would potentially replace the bulky ultrasonic sensor, and be smaller and take less power, and also be more directionally accurate

    However their range may be slighly shorter

  4. There are dozens of projects to assist visually impaired people. The most simple ones use ultrasonic sensors, but lacks precision. The accurate ones use image recognition, which are too complex and need specific services subscription, like Microsoft and IBM. You can use Matlab and also OpenCV to do that, the link below shows an real example from Microsoft and all its capabilities: https://youtu.be/R2mC-NUAmMk

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