Flashing Light Prize 2018: This Time with Neon

The Flashing Light Prize is back this year with a noble twist. And judging from the small set of entries thus far, this is going to be an interesting challenge.

Last year’s Flashing Light Prize was an informal contest with a simple goal: flash an incandescent lamp in the most interesting way possible. This year’s rules are essentially the same as last year, specifying mainly that the bulb itself has to light up — no mechanical shutters — and that it has to flash at 1 Hz with a 50% duty cycle for at least five minutes. But where last year’s contest specified incandescent lamps, this year you’ve got to find a way to flash something with neon in it. It could be an off-the-shelf neon pilot light, a recycled neon sign, or even the beloved Nixie tube. But we suspect that points will be awarded for extreme creativity, so it pays to push the envelope. Last year’s winner used a Wimhurst machine to supply the secondary of an ignition coil and flash a pair of bulbs connected across the primary, so the more Rube Goldberg-esque, the better your chances.

There are only a handful of entries right now, with our favorite being [Ben Krasnow]’s mashup of electricity, mechanics, chemistry, and physics. You’ve got until March 15th to post your flashing neon creation, and there are two categories this year, each with a £200 prize. Get your flash on and win this one for Hackaday.

7 thoughts on “Flashing Light Prize 2018: This Time with Neon

  1. thats how old flame detectors for marine boilers worked, sometimes when the tube aged it would conduct when no UV was hitting the tube, so a chopper (little flap on a motor) would block the light path to test for this, if it conducted when the light was blocked a error signal would be given :)

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