Here’s A Tesla Coil You Can Wear

It’s badgelife season, and if you need an idea for a killer piece of wearable electronics, look no further than this PCB Tesla coil. Yes, it’s killer, doubly so if you’re wearing a pacemaker.

This project was inspired by an earlier Tesla coil on a PCB project that used 160 turns of 6 mil traces on a circuit board as the secondary. All the electronics are there, and it’s powered by USB. Plug this thing in, and you have a pocket full of lightning that’s approximately 30kV. It probably won’t kill you if you touch it, but let’s not test that too much. [Bobricious] took this idea and ran with it, stripping the circuit down to its bare minimum. Now it’s just a single transistor, with all the other parts printed on a circuit board.

There is one problem with making a Tesla Coil on a PCB, and that’s the number of turns on the coil. Any Tesla coil you’ll find is really just the clever application of a single thin wire wrapped around itself a few hundred or thousands of times. This Tesla coil is no different, and in this case it’s 240 turns of a single trace wrapping around a PCB that is 150mm square. [Bobricius] is one of the kings of putting tiny coils on a PCB, and his fiberglass brushless motor is a testament to that. We also just covered his circular linear motor raceway which also uses PCB coils.

The circuit is simple, just a power jack that accepts something around 20 Volts, a single BD243 transistor, an LED, and an 82k resistor. With that, you can lay a small neon tube on the PCB and watch it light up. With another PCB and another neon tube, this circuit board can transfer wireless power. It’s a fun toy, and it’s all PCB tech.

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