Digital Multimeasure Helps You Get The Job Done

In any mechanical field of work, accurate measurement is key to success. [Patrick Panikulam] knows this well, and decided to build a device that would be useful for some of the more tricky measurement tasks he was encountering.

[Patrick]’s digital multi-functional measurement tool packs a bunch of useful hardware into a pocket-sized form factor. There’s a Sharp IR distance sensor for non-contact measurements, a rotary wheel encoder for measuring distances along curved lines, and an MPU6050 IMU packing accelerometers and gyroscopes for measuring angles and surface levels. Control is via touch buttons, so measurements can be taken without disturbing the position of the device.

The use cases for such a device are many and varied. [Patrick] reports using it to verify that his 3D printer bed is leveled, as well as using it to measure curved surfaces in order to accurately cut stickers to suit. It’s got the hardware to serve as a digital protractor, too.

Combining a variety of useful hardware into a compact form factor, while also taking into account usability, has netted [Patrick] a handy tool. It’s not dissimilar from commercial measurement tools available online, and yet is completely built from off-the-shelf parts. Truly a handy device to have in any hacker’s toolbox!

 

 

14 thoughts on “Digital Multimeasure Helps You Get The Job Done

  1. This is glorious! Simple idea showing how cheap CoTS modules can be used to create something much better than the sum of their parts. Lots of nice thoughtful touches too, such as 45 degree case for quick offset measurements. Integrated magnets to attach to metalwork.

    I’d love to see a fusion of the rotary encoder and the IMU to create 3D splines from tracing real world objects.

    1. Geiger counter…
      EMF reader…
      Bottle opener…
      Digital compass…
      Flashlight (“torch” to those across the ponds…)
      Laser pointer…
      Particle accelerator…
      Doom…

  2. I don’t know if it’s even possible, but as long as we’re measuring pi, I’d like to measure slash aitch and the gravitational constant, whatever else they can think of pertaining to the qualities of the universe. A kind of multi-meter…

      1. I hadn’t heard of it either (no surprise there!).

        A related value called the reduced Planck constant, also known as slash aitch or h-bar from its symbol ({\hbar}), is equal to \frac{h}{2 \pi}.
        -RationalWiki

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