Nickel-O-Matic

coins

[Mike] sent in this project. It’s a robot, designed to print on wooden coins while people watch. It was built to be in the iHobby Expo 08 in Chicago. The main movement is controlled by a BASIC Stamp2, while the ink jet system is run off of a Propeller. The entire system has 4 servos, 3 stepper motors, a DC motor, a hacked breast pump, an ink jet head, and 5 IR sensors. in case you missed that, it has a breast pump. We’re assuming that’s the part that picks up the wooden nickels with suction. He states that the project was meant to be entertaining, so there are lots of superfluous and inefficient actions as you can see in the video after the break. Great job [Mike].

Comments

  1. djlspider says:

    where’s the video?

  2. djlspider says:

    THERE IT IS! I guess I jumped the gun.

  3. djrussell says:

    that’s awesome! nice project.

  4. rasz says:

    man that breast pump is loud
    he could of used car central lock pump, or HOTAIR membrane pump

  5. Marco says:

    Nice. Now all it needs is a drill and sander so you can feed it raw lumber.

  6. Andar_b says:

    It would be cooler if it didn’t use an inkjet print head, IIRC most wooden nickels are burnt with the info, I’d have experimented with burning in the image somehow, perhaps a ‘print head’ made with a heated matrix of pins? Or at least burn in one side with the machine info while variable-printing the back.

    Maybe they were avoiding smoke. Besides, woodburning heat would be harder to manage, I guess.

    It might be cool to do something similar with clay poker chips, but mill the design into the surface.

  7. malikaii says:

    @andar_b

    LASERS.

    that high quality work right there.

  8. strider_mt2k says:

    Beautiful machine!

    i’d spend a couple of quarters!

  9. Dave says:

    Awesome! I’ve been looking to make a contraption like this. Where did you buy the helical flex coupling on the stepper motor?

  10. fartface says:

    More of a “lookie lookie” and no sourcecode, schematics, howtwo.

    Neat, bot not worthy of hackaday release the code, drawings and other stuff.

  11. andrew says:

    psh, we don’t need the details to admire his workmanship! seriously, it’s a well-designed machine and works flawlessly, love it.

  12. will says:

    dave: the helical flex coupling on the stepper motor can be bought from McMaster-Carr; they are listed under Heavy Duty Bellows Shaft Couplings.

  13. Mike says:

    All the source code is available over at the Parallax web site, I guess the link didn’t make it into the article. http://www.parallax.com/tabid/769/Default.aspx

    There is a lot of other information there too.

    I don’t have any drawings of schematics, I just don’t work that way most of the time. If any body wants details though just let me know.

    Mike

  14. Mike says:

    All the source code is available over at the Parallax web site, I guess the link didn’t make it into the article. http://www.parallax.com/tabid/769/Default.aspx

    There is a lot of other information there too.

    I don’t have any drawings of schematics, I just don’t work that way most of the time. If any body wants details though just let me know.

    Mike
    Ooops, should have added good post! Waiting for your next one!

  15. philpem says:

    Shame the Parallax printer kits are NLA. Would have rather liked to have a play with one of those… :-(

    Oh well, there’s always the option of using a variant of Sprite’s “inkjet stamp” hack and a HP #40 cartridge…

  16. Mike says:

    Just as a note, this does not use the Parallax inkjet printer kit.

    The inkjet head is pulled from an old ThinkJet and the head is driven directly from the Propeller chip. This is something that anyone can build today and you don’t need to buy anything commercially and you have a lot more control over that the head can do than with the Parallax kit. The code I have on the Parallax website for the Propeller chip would likely get someone started. Mike

  17. matt says:

    if you are still commenting; can you give a description of the machined part that holds your bearing? Or how about a word or two about where to learn how to do it, thanks.

  18. Frank Cohen says:

    @djilspider That’s what she said!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 96,556 other followers