66% or better

Home cinema 3D (or just tick off theatergoers)

After a visit to the local theater and discovering the use of IR 3D glasses (for films such as Avatar), the team over at Furrtek wondered how they worked, and more importantly, how the glasses could be manipulated to tick off audience members. While the original intentions seem a bit childish, they did mention that their final setup could also be used for a home cinema with IR 3D glasses.

Onto the good stuff: the glasses receive IR light pulses timed with the movie to black out the appropriate eye with the appropriate frame and producing a 3D effect. With the use of IR Investigator the team grabbed said timings; it was then simply a matter of building their own IR projector, and bringing it back to the theater to annoy the crowd setting it up for their 3D home cinema.

Comments

  1. DeadlyFoez says:

    Awesome, just awesome. I always loved pissing off a crowd, like using my Sony Clie to turn off tv’s in sports bars during big game and put it to dora instead. Gotta love screwing with people.

  2. Hitek146 says:

    ^And you would hope that the guys at the place I hang out didn’t catch you, lest you awake in the hospital…

  3. th0mas says:

    This is not how a lot of 3d theaters work. The ones I’ve been in use polarized lenses, and two polarized images on the screen at once so each eye only sees the image it’s supposed to. There are theaters giving out 3d shutter glasses? That’s awesome.

  4. PlayNicePeople says:

    If you go to a sports bar and turn off the TVs, you’re acting obnoxious.

    If you go into a theater and interfere with the people watching the movie, (by using your cellphone OR using a IR emitter) you’re acting like a jerk.

  5. ArduinoOs says:

    “I like to park in handicap spaces, while handicap people make handicapped faces, cause I’m an a**hole!”

  6. kirov says:

    this is one of the few legitimate uses of a gameboy ever in a hack project.

  7. Gene says:

    I really liked their resourcefulness in discovering the IR signal protocol. As for their application… I wish someone would kick them in the gnads.

  8. anon says:

    I read this site everyday and here people whinning about how “thats obnoxious” or your a jerk or many others….get over it the whole point of this site is to be creative i say have fun with what you create unless it does physical harm to someone

  9. anon says:

    scratch here for hear lol

  10. anon says:

    apparently no one enjoys giving themselves a good laugh anymore :)

  11. Peter says:

    When someone pays $10 to see a movie, it’s not “fun” to have someone else decide to ruin the experience. What is wrong with these retards?

  12. Skitchin says:

    Quick, put on your cool face!

  13. anon says:

    That site has a lot of useful info, shame most of its in french.

    Gotta admit, you have you to be a total penis to go to a cinema and ruin the film for the ‘first row’, or anyone else.

    -10 for arseholeism.

  14. TedF says:

    If I paid for my family of four to see Avatar, costing at least $50 for tix alone, and some punk wants to screw with our day out, he’s gonna have a problem. Changing the TV at the bar is one thing, wasting my money is another.

  15. daryl says:

    I have no issue with screwing with people, since all you have to do when your glasses stop working is walk out to the customer service desk and ask for a refund. No harm done.

    I like the resourcefulness and think this would be great for a home theater system.

  16. bothersaidpooh says:

    diy shutter glasses are trivial to make using two surplus B/W screens salvaged from broken mobile phones or digital picture frames.

  17. Mike Szczys says:

    @daryl: Getting a refund is fine and dandy, but then it’s the theater that’s out the money and you (and your family) didn’t get the entertainment you planned on that day.

    I enjoy resourcefulness and I appreciate hacks that took some work to figure out. But it’s not right to screw up someone else’s movie experience.

    Even the TV-b-gone can ruin people’s day.

  18. andrew says:

    The glasses given to us to see avatar were not battery powered — they were simply polarized.

  19. mungewell says:

    If you follow the link to the French page, you will see that he’s used a Lady Ada TV-be-gone board… does this mean this is a ‘Movie-be-gone’?

  20. googfan says:

    HA!

  21. anonymous says:

    anon says “I read this site everyday and here people whinning about how “thats obnoxious” or your a jerk or many others….get over it the whole point of this site is to be creative i say have fun with what you create unless it does physical harm to someone”

    How about I come to your house and cut the electricity, phone, and water off for a laugh. To make it creative, I’ll do it with an autonomous robot. Nobody is physically harmed, so I trust you’ll take it in good humor.

  22. fenwick says:

    I’ve never seen the IR glasses used, all I’ve seen are the polarized ones.

    Also, wasting other people’s money shouldn’t be something you consider ‘fun’.

  23. David S says:

    Yea, this is pretty weak. There would seem to be a lot of holes with this technique anyway.

    Also, avatar (and many movies like it) use polarized glasses the two lenses where one is polarized for the vertical and one for the horizontal. The light going out onto the screen is also polarized such that there will essentially two images displayed on the screen where one image gets blocked out for each eye.

  24. FDP says:

    This is hacking, followed by being obnoxious with the knowledge gained.

    I’m fine with the first part, but there is something inherently childish in wasting other people’s time just because you find it amusing.

    I’m just going to go ahead and assume that the maker is 13 years old.

  25. gothicbob says:

    @David S: They’re not horizontally and vertically polarised, they use circular polarisers.

    You can test this by wearing a pair of glasses and looking at another pair (both facing same direction) and rotating the glasses you will notice that none of the polarisers goes dark (test for one eye closed each time). Then try doing this with the glasses the other way around, you will notice at 90 degrees rotation that when you close an eye one of glasses turns black (one black for each eye)

  26. meh says:

    @gothicbob

    Uh, circular polarisers ? You’re the one running around in circles. David is right. And if you think why 2 lenses cancel each other out when they’re rotated 90 degrees, you’ll understand why he’s right. At least, I hope you do…

  27. Loren says:

    Or you could get a bluetooh headset with a bright blue blinking light. Someone had one in a theater i was in.

  28. Ben Ryves says:

    @meh: RealD certainly uses circular polarisers. Try looking at an LCD monitor (which uses linear polarisation) through RealD glasses and you’ll see that at whichever angle you hold them at you can still see through them. Note that you can also tilt your head in the cinema and not see a double image, as you would with linear polarisers.

  29. mungewell says:

    There was a presentation at Defcon16 about Digital Cinema tech, including the _various_ 3D methods.

    Slides are here:
    http://www.defcon.org/images/defcon-16/dc16-presentations/defcon-16-renlund.pdf

    And there is also a video, which may be floating around the net somewhere.

  30. pn2bade says:

    Ya, there’s no way that they are shutter glasses, unless there are different kinds. I have nVidia’s 3d shutter glasses that I use for 3d gaming and they cost me $160. Of course they did come with an IR sencor to though, but still.

  31. Fallen says:

    Agreed with Ben Ryves.
    I worked at a place that was ramping up production of it’s 3D capable digital cinima projectors.(Maybe for Avatar :S either way it was crazy, we went from 100 something a month to 4-5 hundred) I read as many technical documents on it as I could. The projectors we built had circular polarizers.

  32. meh says:

    I stand corrected.

  33. Gene says:

    @daryl: Sure, and I have no problem with people taking a bat to parked cars, since all they have to do is go to their insurance company and get it reimbursed. No harm done.

  34. Paul says:

    Seems like people missed the fact that they didn’t run it at a public cinema but at home.. Or people just like to complain on the internet

  35. jesse says:

    so many horrible analogies in these comments.

    clever hack.

  36. Wdfowty says:

    Theater-b-gone

  37. Yen says:

    @mugewell
    there is a video – right off of the defcon website.
    https://media.defcon.org/dc-16/video/Defcon16-Mike_Renlund-The_Big_Picture.m4v

  38. Drone says:

    3D-B-Gone

  39. therian says:

    Nothing give me more inspiration than desire to screw someone :)

  40. yup says:

    Seems like that epiphany occurs every thread, from each opposing viewpoint.

  41. Whatnot says:

    I’d say using this is clearly illegal because it interferes with a business willfully and I’m sure there are laws for that for centuries already, and I hope the cops caps the ones doing this kind of stuff, not deadly of course, and they should be easy to spot so easy to catch.

  42. Ya, there’s no way that they are shutter glasses, unless there are different kinds. I have nVidia’s 3d shutter glasses that I use for 3d gaming and they cost me $160. Of course they did come with an IR sencor to though, but still. ya okey

  43. ArtemisGoldfish says:

    Man, shutter glasses for 3D at a theater seems weird, thought it was cheaper just to put the circular polarizer in front of the projector and give out those circular polarization glasses like Real3D uses.

  44. Erik says:

    Polarized lenses for stereo vision movies are circularly polarized, not linearly. The same eye between two pairs does not dim no matter how you rotate it. However one eye against an opposite eye between pairs /will/ dim.

    All this toy does is to black out one eye to cancel the stereo effect. Sure it makes it less enjoyable/not as intended, but you do not miss any part of the movie unless its stereo-ness was part of the plot…

  45. Philip says:

    Drone has definatly chosen the best name so far.

  46. synth says:

    not a bad hack.
    sweet gameboy app [the analyzer].. i will have to
    bust mine out and take a new look at homebrew offerings.

    also, that was hilarious.
    i have zero problems with this.
    bravo.

  47. zzx says:

    Even better use for this technology – move houses can double the number of screens just by projecting two movies at once on each screen. (The glasses you get determine which movie you see.)

    If you want to see a chick flick and your date wants to see an action movie – no problem.
    Screenings of movies about smurfs, barney or other toddler brain-rot could allow the parent to see something else.

    Of course one would have to wear headphones to get the soundtrack – but that could be broadcast to your bluetooth headset (seems like everyone has those permanently implanted nowadays.)

  48. Marty says:

    @daryl – I have no issue with you screwing around with something which cost me time and money, as long as you’re ok with me putting my foot through your stupid fat head.

    I can’t get the time reimbursed that I lost from your ‘joke’, but knowing you’ll be spending double the time in the local infirmary will be satisfactory.

    Seriously – don’t fuck with people’s time and money.

  49. Anon says:

    @DeadlyFoez

    Looks like I’m not the only one who still uses a Sony Clie!

  50. therian says:

    @Marty
    look who we have here, a brain surgeon or nuclear physicist whos time is priceless, than why you waist it on movie go save humanity

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