SkyWalker: a really really tall bike

[Brad Graham] enjoys building bikes. He threw together a tall bike called the SkyWalker and then shared the build details. It’s got everything you’d expect in a fixed-gear bike; a seat, pedals, steering, and two wheels. You’ll have to do a bit of climbing to get into the saddle but the incorporated ladder doubles as passenger space. [Brad] says the thing has no problem supporting up to four riders at a time. Check out the video after the break to see that the ladder and large-height steering frame make the bike easy to stop and start without leaning on something. Wow.

We’re thrilled and scared at the same time. At least that over-under tandem had full-sized wheels. But those tiny rims on this oblong creation? Yikes!

35 thoughts on “SkyWalker: a really really tall bike

  1. The site is down…

    The bike in the video is not the same as the yellow bike in the picture. I question the stability of the yellow one at low speeds and during mounting/dismounting.

  2. I’m a Nigerian Zoologist studying Giraffes in the Sudan, I’d like to give you 4.8 Million US to further the development of such a great research bike. Please send me all your personal data and bank info so that I can start the wire transfer.

  3. Holly cr** that is so awesome. Simple design, extreme possibilities – I love it.

    I love even more other people’s reactions – they are seriously in a WTF state.

    This is a hack.

  4. Awesome! You are the boss. But I am afraid for your safety. How will it go if you tip over? You jump off and land on your feet? I hope so. Anyways, this is a “don’t try this at home” isn’t it? You go!

  5. @Jaymz

    It doesn’t sound that dangerous, at least it is low enough to allow landing on feet safely. It also has a lot of room to move and prevent getting stuck in the frames in case of tipping over. The only thing I think it might be a little dangerous is the case he is cycling near a car and he tips over..

  6. Yeah, definitely not fixed-gear. Singlespeed, but not fixed-gear.

    I’m no safety stickler or anything, but this guy REALLY needs to use a helmet. Besides that, this thing is awesome.

  7. Hey thanks for posting my crazy bike. I do miss riding that beast, and never once had any mishaps on it. You can see for miles in all directions, so traffic cannot surprise you!

    When you are stuck indoors programming Verilog all day, it’s nice to go out and surf the urban skies once and a while.

    Cheers.
    Brad of AtomicZombie.com & LucidScience.com

  8. That is awesome.

    As for the getting up/down, you can clearly see him having one hand on the handle bars to steer the bike and keep it from tipping over.

    I would question tipping over, simply because it does not look like he could realistically get enough space between him and the frame. I’d want to get out of it before landing and it doesnt look that easy from the location of his feet.

    Also, this would fail in canada, too many potholes.: (

  9. Theres a group in canberra, Australia who do this. They just weld bike frames ontop of one another. No as high as this though

  10. Riding these things on level ground is fine, but I had a friend who had a shorter tall bike and he had trouble going up inclines, his bike kept trying to do wheelies…

  11. i want to see him go up a hill in my city lol he will be on his butt in a few minutes when he tryes to ride down here id say try jousting but i guess that would be too dangerous for this thing. Still good job not really a hack just a mod but its still good.

  12. I find it amazing how many people on this site question the practicality of a “hack.” Dude built a tall bike for fun and experience not to ride to work everyday. I give him props and kudos.

  13. That’s wonderfully pointless, and looks like a wonderful way to have fun and break your neck at the same time. :-)

    Kudos to Brad and his big brass balls for daring to mount that thing!

  14. Brad is, was, and always will be one of my favorite online hacker dudes.

    Gave me and my lil’ home made rover a great write up in his book years ago, and remains a positive force in the hacker world to this day.

    You rock man!

  15. “But those tiny rims on this oblong creation? Yikes!”

    All else equal (quality of rim, hub, spokes) smaller wheels are stronger and stiffer. With those big, heavy frames, smaller wheels make sense. Its not like they are designed for rolling over obstacles anyhow…

  16. I’m glad it’s got a ladder incorporated into the frame, when the rider feels the bike start to fall over he can get off the saddle very quickly and run down the ladder to the safety of the ground before the bike hits the deck. Very clever engineering!

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