A 3D-Printed Egg-Shaped Speaker Cabinet

There are few limits to the extent audiophiles will go in their quest for the perfect sound. This applies in particular to the loudspeaker, and with that aim [Heine Nielsen] has created an eye-catching set of 3D-printed egg-shaped enclosures.

The theory of a loudspeaker enclosure is that it should simulate an infinite space behind an infinite plane in which the speaker driver is mounted, and the reasoning behind spherical or egg-shaped enclosures goes that they better achieve that aim through presenting a uniform inner surface without the corners of a more conventional rectangular enclosure. [Heine]’s enclosures 3D-printed ported enclosures achieve this more easily than traditional methods of building this shape.

A loudspeaker enclosure is more than just a box though, whatever material it is made from must adequately dampen any resonances and absorb as much energy as possible. Conventional speakers try to achieve this by using high-mass and particulate materials, but 3D-printing does not lend itself to this. Instead, he created a significant air gap between two layers which he hopes will create the same effect.

This is an interesting design and approach to speaker cabinet construction, but we think from an audio perspective its one that will be well served by more development. What would be the effect of filling that air gap with something of higher mass, for example, and should the parameters of the egg shape and the port be derived for a particular driver by calculation from its Thiele-Small parameters. We look forward to more on this theme.

These aren’t the first 3D-printed enclosures we’ve seen, but if you’re after something truly unusual how about an electrostatic?

21 thoughts on “A 3D-Printed Egg-Shaped Speaker Cabinet

  1. Eggellent eggcoustics.

    But really, any internal sound reflections will have so may different phases that they will likely cancel out.

    Also, I didn’t know eggs are mammals. Cute though.

    1. actually all lifeforms have eggs but only bird type animals like chickens and birds lay eggs and the bird has to sit on the eggs to keep them warm.

      the rest of the animals develop their babies internally

      1. New design on thingiverse is much better, wish i had that ready when i sent the speakers to San Fansisco, but this was less then 6 months after i started 3D printing, and have some amps and such coming on thingiverse soon, i try to iron out all bugs before posting anything

  2. I don’t like what chicken hens stand up to deposit, but the shape is OK. This makes a reasonable attempt to have different nodes of resonance, knowing that a sphere is the worst egg shape is better. A purposelessly asymmetric shape would be best, and possible by printing.

    There is some difference in cabinet design. Some want the cabinet to be inert and not absorb any energy, not to vibrate or dampen bass. Concrete and drainage tiles. It may be lined or stuffed with fiber. Other design had sand between thinner panels. Sand might be a good choice to fill the print’s hollows.

    1. depending on infill pattern used it could be hard to do and very time consuming to pour into them while printing or have it pause before top layers and hope it will pour all the way through, but the air gap does wonders as is in keeping most resonance away from outer walls.

  3. I love old style potenciometer, flight switch button (and fire button) etc.
    look ad jumbojet control how beatiful buttons!
    it is usefull and get responsibility.

    this not have spirit

  4. “The theory of a loudspeaker enclosure is that it should simulate an infinite space behind an infinite plane in which the speaker driver is mounted, and the reasoning behind spherical or egg-shaped enclosures goes that they better achieve that aim through presenting a uniform inner surface without the corners of a more conventional rectangular enclosure.”

    No.
    The theory of a loudspeaker enclosure is to present a well-defined air volume to the driver to achieve a useful frequency response. This can be calculated using the TSP of the driver (Thiele-Small-Parameters). In this case, it is not only the well-defined volume, but also the well-defined hole, which presents an air spring and contributes to the bass response. This can also be calculated using the TSP.

    What the egg-shape does though, is to minimize standing waves by reflecting in all directions and not just in parallel like a more traditional approach. Further dampening would be useful, but this is probably good enough.

    This is actually a quite nice approach for a bass reflex design.

    See also:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thiele/Small_parameters
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bass_reflex

    1. Bang on :), also why i made 30+ before i ever posted any versions, has cost me a lot to get them to where they are, and have made 100’s of speakers boxes myself before getting into 3D printing, next the drivers them self’s, well to begin with SUB units as these sioux units sound VERY good.
      i am still amazed by the sound in these eggs, and looking forward to when the new BIG printer is done so i can make 6″ and bigger to add to the mix :), and other sizes in the future.

      Oh and there is just a thin foam to dampen the midrange “noise” coming out of the bass port.
      And one nice thing with 3D printing is walls are double, inner and outer wall in all walls, this “air” barrier really kills most resonance, stopping most from hitting outer wall/shell

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