DIY Servo motor controller


[Jim Fong] sent in this demo of his version of the UHU servo motor controller. [Uli Huber] has actually shipped over 2500 controllers for the servo. He doesn’t charge much for the chips, and only asks for something like a token beer in return for his work. I used [Jim]s boards in my mini mill controller, so I know he does good work. This servo controller really is a big deal. It can handle high power, and servo motors are *the* way to build a fast milling/robotics setup.

If you’re into Cons, you might be interested that the first round of Shmoocon tickets went up for sale today – looks like they’re already out, so keep your eyes open if you want to go. It’s a decent con that takes place in DC. I know that I’m planning to be there.

12 thoughts on “DIY Servo motor controller

  1. am i trippen balls or is that cnc mill a sign from god i wan just about to order some expensive as shit parts to build my own thx so much for saving my ass peace out

  2. [3] no. A stepper motor is an open-loop system, which means there is no position feedback. You can lose track of position if you push it too hard. A servo system is CLOSED loop: there is an encoder that keeps track of rotational position. Steppers are simpler and cheaper. Servo motors are less cheap, but can really fly.

  3. That was very cool. If I might make a small suggestion, it would probably be useful to attach the suction right to the cnc mill.

    -Crystal

  4. Crystal (post#7)–

    I just finished the cnc conversion over the weekend and haven’t had a chance to add a vacuum attachment to it yet.

    I have another cnc mill that uses a locline vacuum attachment http://www.embeddedtronics.com/micromill.html.
    I might use the same concept for the gantry mill.

    Nate (post#8)–

    Each servo driver board is for one motor. You would have to build three of them for a 3 axis cnc mill.

    Jim

  5. Servo motors do not use steppers with encoders.

    Servo’s use standard DC motors (or brushless) with an encoder on the back. Or a pot that tells the motor how much it has left to turn.

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