I need someone to explain this to me.

The passing of Bob Pease

We are saddened by the recent passing of [Bob Pease]. You may not be familiar with the man, but his work has touched your lives in more ways than you can count. As an electronics engineer who specialized in analog components he was responsible for hardware that made some of the electronics in your life possible, and designed components that you’ve probably used if you dabble in electronic design.

EDN has a lengthy obituary celebrating his life and accomplishments. [Bob] was part of the 1961 graduating class at MIT. He started his career designing tube amplifiers before finding his way to a position at National Semiconductor about fifteen years later. Throughout his career he worked to promote education about analog electronics both through written text, and more recently as the host of Analog by Design, an online video program where a panel of experts discuss the ins and outs of electronics.

[Bob] was killed in an automobile accident on June 18th at the age of 70.

[via Make]

Comments

  1. DanJ says:

    RIP Bob. Thanks for everything. I enjoyed your articles.

    Sadly, he was returning from a memorial service for Jim Williams who helped found Linear Technology.

    Ironically he had written a book “How to Drive into Accidents — and How Not to.”

  2. indecisive says:

    wow 2 ends of the spectrum, Ryan Dunn – a jackass, and Bob Pease. maybe cars just arnt meant for people on the east coast.

  3. Eugene says:

    We should all be so fortunate to have made such a significant mark on the world. I considered him one of my mentors even though I did not know him personally, I knew him by his writing and always came away with better insight into electronics and engineering.

  4. zacdee16 says:

    I’ve never heard of this guy (probably because I’m younger), but it’ sad that his life was ended short by a vehicle. That’s like walking into traffic on your 120th birthday, he shouldn’t have gone that way.

  5. xorpunk says:

    I like how Europeans who trash Americans daily get really quiet when reminded that Americans did most of the work in the fields of cryptography and engineering..

    Who cares about math and engineering..buy an arduino

  6. Matthieu says:

    @xorpunk Not sure if trolling, or just very stupid…

  7. North says:

    Just heard.

    This is a sad day.

  8. andgate says:

    @xorpunk Now you just look like an ignorant American…

  9. Homer Simpson says:

    I used to read “pease porridge” in electronics design magazine back in the day. Great articles on troubleshooting analog circuits. You will be missed Bob

  10. Chuck Simmons says:

    Greatly saddened by the news of Bob Pease. He was a standard that I always tried to achieve – brilliant and rebellious.

  11. arcnemisis says:

    rip Bob, a true great in electronics, engineering and just a great guy. I will miss his datasheets, articles and books.

  12. Peter says:

    A great loss.

    RIP, Bob

  13. lwatcdr says:

    Never heard of him before now. My loss his video casts look great. Hey HAD how about a link a day to stuff like Analog by Design. Now I wonder what other great sites I am missing out on.

  14. Kevin says:

    He was a great innovator, mentor and person. He would help out anyone that asked. I only know him through his “Pease Porridge” column and other writings. Always willing to help, he has raised the bar for all engineers.

    I’ll miss him

  15. DrDoug says:

    Time to continue carrying on the torch…

  16. Dan says:

    @indecisive- ever DRIVEN on an east coast road (particularly Northeast)? then you’d understand ;)

  17. wardy says:

    Bob Pease died while driving home from the funeral of his friend (and equally famous fellow analog electronics genius) Jim Williams.

  18. Njay says:

    Two very big and sad losses in a single week… man, the gurus that were there when microelectronics started are fading away.

  19. brainzilla says:

    Rest in Peace Bob!

    A sad day…

  20. stormdog says:

    I’d never met him, but I considered him one of my heroes. Always enjoyed “Pease Porrige”, and I have a copy of “Troubleshooting Analog Circuits”. He will be missed.

  21. Agent420 says:

    “rip Bob, a true great in electronics, engineering and just a great guy. I will miss his datasheets, articles and books.”

    +10

  22. Soundwavehi says:

    Sad day… I have one of his books on troubleshooting analog circuits, very well written, quite old but still great… You will be missed sir.

  23. charper says:

    Seriously HaD. Please mention Jim Williams too. He was seriously one of my heroes.

    He was well-known for doodling in the blank sheet meant for his app notes (random, really funny things). Later in his career Linear started keeping them in.

    He also has one of the funniest app notes I’ve ever seen: Linear App Note 45. He brought his baby into the lab to work on some projects. “As such, the circuits are annotated with the number of feedings required for their completion; e.g. a ’3-bottle circuit’ took three feedings. The circuit’s degree of difficulty, and Michael’s degree of cooperation, combined to determine the bottle rating, which is duly recorded in each figure.”

    • Kilo says:

      I just hit that link and it comes up as not found.
      Apparently Linear dropped it.
      I actually conversed with Bob on more than one occasion.
      His writings were informative and hilarious.
      Bob was a great man.
      k

  24. stormdog says:

    @charper Thanks for that link. I hadn’t seen that particular App Note.

  25. grenadier says:

    The world has lost a great engineer, and it’d be hard for somebody to step into Bob’s shoes.

  26. marshall_plan says:

    @andgate

    Those “ignorant Americans” started the semiconductor manufactures your European intelligence services just love to spy on and steal secrets from.

  27. av says:

    RIP Bob,
    About once a year, i used to send a mail to Bob requesting clarifications about op-amps, power supplies and suchlike. He always answered within 24hrs, and gave crisp answers.

    I was always amazed that a man of his standing, and his level of work-responsibilities would take the pains to write long detailed technical mails to a nobody from India.

    I learnt a lot from Bob’s mails, and am deeply indebted to him. I will always miss his analog genius.

    av

  28. NateOcean says:

    As a grad student back in the 1970s I rang up National Semi to ask a question about a circuit. Lucky me, I was connected to Bob Pease who spent considerable time explaining the part and how I could improve my design. Unexpectedly, a week later he sent me a sample with a handwritten note.

    Later as an engineer in Silicon Valley, I’d occasionally run into Bob. Last time I saw him was about a decade ago at the Foothill Electronics Flea Market. It was a joy to have him sign my copy of his book. He wrote: “May all your circuit design problems be big ones… that way they will be easy to find!”

    The world of analog design lost two great ones this week. Jim Williams and Bob Pease.

  29. xorpunk says:

    @andgate: I’m in/from America?

    @Matthieu: I live in Europe and I’m an engineer..just saying how it is..

  30. Oli says:

    So sad, I learnt so much reading his articles.

    Paix à ton âme, Bob.

  31. He’s the uncle I Didn’t know I’d had.

    Too bad people will cry and fawn over the “Jackass” MTv second-rate B-cast moron who did something dumb to kill himself and others and recklessly risk the lives of strangers…and 99% of the under-40-crowd wont care even after they are told who he was.

    Sorry, Gen Z (some Y and X, too), a lot of you have your priorities screwed up.

  32. Life2Death says:

    http://electronicdesign.com/

    Only reason I got the mag was to read his “Whats all this _____ anyhow?” themed colum

  33. Trollicus says:

    It’s the quiet heroes that make our world better and advance humankind.

    Add up all the sports stars of today and their contributions won’t equal this one man, their salaries and lifestyles are just a drain and contribute nothing.

    The fastest man on earth can be outrun by the cheapest car.

    The strongest man can’t lift more than a $20 jack.

    It’s time we celebrated the true HEROES of our generation, not the guy who signs the biggest football contract and makes the most money from wearing underwear in a commercial.

  34. andrew says:

    @nateocean: I met him in Rochester for a seminar. I ended up staying at the same hotel as him, and we got into a bit of his brandy. I have the same book, also autographed by him, although he wrote in mine “here’s to all your problems being middle-sized ones… so you can find ‘em!”

    Brilliant guy, didn’t accept bullshit and always had something interesting and relevant to say. sad to see him go.

  35. Phil says:

    I met Bob at 3 of the National seminars. I have his Troubleshooting Analog Circuits, personally autographed. I will miss his column and and wit.
    He and Jim Williams will be missed by many of us.
    Rest in Peace Bob and Jim.
    an old analog die hard

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