Vintage Video Projector Lives Again

Projectors are getting a lot less expensive these days, what with China pumping out Pico projectors by the boat load and all. But did you know it’s not that hard to convert an old slide projector to digital? [Alec Smecher] shows us how with a 1950’s LaBelle 75 slide projector, and the result is pretty awesome.

dmd_chipDigital projectors can use a few different technologies to work. The best, and brightest is DLP (Digital Light Processing) by Texas Instruments — which is pretty well the world-wide standard for high-end, high-lumen digital projection. It works by bouncing red, green, and blue light off of three DMD’s (Digital Micromirror Devices) which have an array of tiny 2-position mirrors, with each representing a pixel.

One of the older technologies is LCD, which is even easier to understand. You shine white light through a color LCD, and there is your projection. All you need for a projector, then, is an LCD, a light source, and a bit of optics.

Continue reading “Vintage Video Projector Lives Again”

Converting transparency sheets to an LCD monitor

Apparently, there’s some sort of sporting event being televised this weekend that has been historically used as an excuse to buy a big-screen TV. [Joel] wanted a huge-screen TV on the cheap, so he converted an overhead projector to something he can use with his XBox.

Using a bare LCD panel with an overhead projector is a decades-old hack we’ve covered before. The basic idea is fairly simple, but we’ve never seen anything that could be considered a semi-permanent build. [Joel] started his project by picking up a surplus overhead projector for $25 and routing a cutting board to mount the LCD in. The bulb in the projector added a lot of heat, so three small fans are used to blow air between the projector glass and the LCD display.

[Joel] started off looking at the LumenLab DIY projector project, but considered that to be a terrible amount of work with a fairly high initial investment. If you don’t count the few LCDs [Joel] burned through while building his project, his projector was built for under $100. We’re loving the result and are sure it will be much appreciated at [Joel]’s LAN parties.