Wireless Helmet Speakers Receive A+ For Distracting Wearer

What could be better than cruising around town on your fave scooter? Cruising around town on your fave scooter listening to some cool tunes, of course! [sswanton] was enrolled in an Industrial Design course and was tasked with creating a wireless radio project for a specific user (of his choice). He decided to add some wireless speakers to a motorcycle helmet and design a handlebar-mounted radio.

Helmet Radio[sswanton] started out by disassembling the ultra-inexpensive, old-school, battery-powered Sony ICF-S22 radio specified by the class. The stock case was discarded as he would have to make a new one that fits onto the bike’s handlebars. Plywood makes up majority of the frame while the cover is black acrylic. Getting the acrylic bent required heating to 160 degrees so that it could be bent around a form [sswanton] created specifically for this project. A few cutouts in the case allows the rider to access the volume and tuning knobs.

The speakers added to the helmet were from wireless headphones and came with a matched transmitter. The transmitter was removed from it’s unnecessarily large case, installed in the radio’s newly created enclosure and connected to the radio’s headphone output. Situating the headphone components in the ideal locations of the helmet required that the headphones be disassembled. The speakers were placed in the helmets ear cups. Part of the original headphone case and some control buttons were mounted on the outside of the helmet for easy access. The wires connecting the components had to be extended to reconnect the now spread-out parts.

In order to hear that sweet music all the rider needs to do is turn on the headphones and radio. Check this out to see some more helmet speakers, this time a little more wacky.

Hackaday Links: December 22, 2013


[Korben] is using a picture frame as a Bluetooth speaker (translated). He hacked a Rock’R² for this project. It’s a device that has a vibrating element which can be used to make any hollow item into a speaker.

Entertain yourself over the holidays by mastering the Apollo Guidance Computer simulator. It’s a JavaScript version of the computer used in the modules of the Apollo moon missions.  [Thanks Gregory and Paul]

Here’s a little mirror attachment that lets you use your laptop as an overhead projector. [Ian] calls it the ClipDraw. Affix it to the webcam and use the keyboard as the drawing surface. Since it’s simply using the camera this works for both live presentations and video conferencing. What we can’t figure out is why the image doesn’t end up backward?

This guide will let you turn a Carambola board into an AirPlay speaker.

Those who suck at remembering the rules for a game of pool will enjoy this offering. It’s some add-on hardware that uses a color sensor to detect when a ball is pocketed. The Raspberry Pi based system automatically scores each game.

We spend waaaay too much time sitting at the computer. If we had a treadmill perhaps we’d try building [Kirk’s] treadmill desk attachment. It’s made out of PVC and uses some altered reduction fittings to make the height adjustable. It looks like you lose a little bit of space at the front of the belt, but if you’re just using it at a walking pace that shouldn’t matter too much.

You can have your own pair of smart tweezers for just a few clams. [Tyler] added copper tape to some anti-static tweezers. The copper pads have wires soldered to them which terminate on the other end with some alligator clips. Clip them to your multimeter and you’ve got your own e-tweezers.