Ghost Rider Costume Is Smoking Hot

It’s that spooky time of year once again, with pumpkins and cobwebs as far as the eye can see. This year, [Mikeasaurus] has put together something really special – a Ghost Rider costume with some amazing effects.

The costume starts with the skull mask, which started with a model from Thingiverse. Conveniently, the model was already set up to be 3D printed in separate pieces. [Mike] further modified the design by cutting out the middle to make it wearable. The mask was printed in low resolution and then assembled. [Mike] didn’t worry too much about making things perfect early on, as the final finish involved plenty of sanding and putty to get the surface just right. To complete the spooky look, the skull got a lick of ivory paint and a distressed finish with some diluted black acrylic.

With the visual components complete, [Mike] turned his attention to the effects. Light is courtesy of a series of self-blinking LEDs, fitted inside the mask to give the eye sockets a menacing orange glow. However, the pièce de résistance is the smoke effect, courtesy of a powerful e-cigarette device and an aquarium pump. At 225W, and filled with vegetable glycerine, this combination produces thick clouds of smoke which emanate from the back of the wearer’s jacket and within the skull itself. Truly stunning.

[Mike] reports that the costume is scary enough that he has been banned from answering the door as Ghost Rider. We think it’s bound to be a hit, regardless. For another epic mask build, check out the Borderlands Psycho. Video after the break.

 

20 thoughts on “Ghost Rider Costume Is Smoking Hot

      1. This produces fog only if you suck air through it. A real fog machine pumps the fluid into the heating coil, so it pushes out fog and you do not need to inhale it to get it produced.

    1. There are special miniature fog machines, complete with heating coil and fluid pump. They even have e remote control. But they are really expensive. The heating coil is in reality made from the stainless steel capillary tubing used for surgical needles. It is heated electrically and the fluid is passed through the tubing.

    2. “However, the pièce de résistance is the smoke effect, courtesy of a powerful e-cigarette device and an aquarium pump. At 225W, and filled with vegetable glycerine, this combination produces thick clouds of smoke which emanate from the back of the wearer’s jacket and within the skull itself. Truly stunning.”

      Right in the article.

  1. Am I understanding this right?

    An e-cigarette device is drawing power for the duration of the ‘scare’ and the vapor, is being propelled by the pump. If so, I’d hate to risk that device blowing up. Those devices have had some negative press lately and that’s from using them as intended.

    1. All of the bad cases were idiots using unprotected cells with devices of questionable origin and safeties…doesn’t matter what it is, if it’s powered by a (relatively) large lithium cell, it needs protection…

      1. Yeah, it was always something like “dude had a bare 18650 cell in a pocket with his keys and coins and other conductive items”. Of course there will be a problem if you short out a lipo cell! But it doesn’t mean the equipment is inherently prone to exploding.

  2. I had a top of the line organ known to be full of tantalum caps and thus really unreliable. The piece de capacitance was when suddenly RED SMOKE wafted out of the stop rail! I knew that was it along with hums and pops and the preset board trashed by the shorted cap. There is one on every stop tablet.

    Red smoke. Do the chemistry, probably bad for you. But it looks BAD.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.