Memory Mapping Methods in the Super Nintendo

Not only is the Super Nintendo an all-around great platform, both during its prime in the 90s and now during the nostalgia craze, but its relative simplicity compared to modern systems makes it a lot more accessible from a computer science point-of-view. That means that we can get some in-depth discussion on how the Super Nintendo actually does what it does, and understand most of it, like this video from [Retro Game Mechanics Explained] which goes into an incredible amount of detail on the mechanics of the SNES’s memory system.

Two of the interesting memory systems the SNES uses are called DMA and HDMA. DMA stands for direct memory access, and is a way for the Super Nintendo to access memory independently of the CPU. The advantages to this are that it’s incredibly fast compared to more typical methods of accessing memory. This isn’t particulalry unique, but the HDMA system is. It allows the SNES to do all kinds of interesting tricks with its video output display like changing color gradients and doing all kinds of masking effects.

If you’re interested in the inner workings of classic consoles like the SNES, this video gets way down in the weeds in the system itself. It’s interesting to see how programmers were able to squeeze more capability from these limited (by modern standards) systems by manipulating memory like the DMA and HDMA systems do.  [Retro Game Mechanics Explained] is a great resource for exploring in-depth aspects of lots of classic games, like how speedrunners can execute arbitrary code in old Mario games.

6 thoughts on “Memory Mapping Methods in the Super Nintendo

    1. “DMA by itself is pretty useful, but Nintendo thought up another way of using the DMA controller that really made the SNES the great console that it is. Instead of immediately halting the CPU and performing the copy, they created “HDMA” mode, which performs one transfer during each horizontal blanking period. This allows you to do neat things like set a color every scanline, which is how the gradient fills in Chrono Trigger’s menus are done. ” – https://wiki.superfamicom.org/#toc-hdma-mode

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