Wireless LEDs Aren’t A First, But You Can Make Your Own

Wireless LEDs. That’s what [Scotty Allen] found in Japan, and if you find something you just have to replicate it.

[Scotty] found these wireless LEDs in a display stand for model makers and gunpla. Because you don’t want to run wires, drill holes, and deal with fiber optics when illuminating plastic models, model companies have come up with wireless LEDs. Just glue them on, and they’ll blink. It requires a base station, but these are wireless LEDs.

After buying a few of these LEDs and sourcing a base station, [Scotty] found the LEDs were three components carefully soldered together: an inductor, two caps, and the LED itself. The base station is simply two coils and are effectively a wireless phone charger. Oh, some experimentation revealed that if you put one of these wireless LEDs on a wireless phone charger it’ll light up.

The next step is of course replication, so [Scotty] headed out to Akihabara and grabbed some wire, resistors, and LEDs. The wire was wrapped into a coil, a LED soldered on, and everything worked. This is by no means the first DIY wireless LED, as with so many technologies this too hit fashion first and you could buy press-on nails with embedded wireless LEDs for years now. Check out the video below.

24 thoughts on “Wireless LEDs Aren’t A First, But You Can Make Your Own

    1. I’ve just googled it myself. I’m not really sure why it needs its own word, but it seems harmless enough. I’ve put together some plastic model kits during my time.

    2. For the rest of us OFs…

      Gundam models, as well as the hobby of assembling and painting them, is known in Japan as Gunpla (ガンプラ Ganpura), a portmanteau of “Gundam plastic model”, plastic being the most common material for the retail kits.

      -Wikipedia

  1. So how would one go about making these charge while in the field so they can work for say 10 seconds after leaving the field?

    I think you could make the LC circuit store much more energy, but then it starts to get physically big. Could you rectify the current and store it in a separate, large capacitor that feeds the LED?

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