Lego Heist Bot Steals Keys

Breaking and entering is a felony offense, and one that risks the interloper receiving serious bodily harm for the trouble. Sending in a robot instead is an attractive alternative. While we doubt any actual intention to use their creation for evil, [Brick Experiment Channel] have nonetheless built a viable heist bot out of Lego.

The robot in question is actually two, that work together to execute their mission. Once lowered in the house, the scissor lift bot drives into position next to a coffee table. It then lifts its companion bot into position by extending its motor-driven linear actuators. The recovery bot then drives out onto the table, snatches a set of keys with its arm, and returns to the lift bot, before exiting the house. It’s all achieved with the use of the SBrick, a third-party Lego accessory which allows remote control of Lego motors over Bluetooth. A wireless camera also helps out with vision for the platform.

Lego really does make it easy to build quick, functional mechanisms without a whole lot of fuss. We’ve seen it employed in all sorts of ways, like this handy film scanner. Video after the break.

7 thoughts on “Lego Heist Bot Steals Keys

  1. No, no, no…you have to have the bot coming in through a skylight and spidering down an improbably thin set of lines to come just short of hitting the floor face first, then doing all the things while avoiding “laser beam” security and getting away with it all in spite of y̶o̶u̶ ̶k̶i̶d̶s̶ plot complications. Didn’t anyone watch “Mission Impossible”?

    More interesting is stealing all the robots themselves (or nearly so)

    https://techcrunch.com/2008/04/28/the-true-story-of-an-irobot-spy-and-a-300-million-theft/

  2. Very impressive, though I was concerned about the stability – I’m wondering it it took a few takes for it not to fall over with that scissor lift.
    It also seems somewhat reliant on the keys being in a known location, though I guess you could spot them through another window.
    But security wise it’s hardly an issue. The open window would probably fit a thin adult in, and certainly a small child. If you’re leaving an opening that big unsecured, your security is shot. Someone quick probably reach round and open a bigger window.

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