Analog projection clock so simple you should have thought of it

The image you see above is the result of a simple analog projection clock. It shows the time on the ceiling. We have one in our bedroom but it’s a red digital display which we don’t think is nearly as fun as this clever hack. Grab a cheap analog clock, a mirror, and a white LED and you can build your own.

The mirror is going to reflect light from the LED onto a ceiling or other surface. It acts as the clock face. The tick marks for each hour were made by scratching the reflective material (often called the silvering) from the back of the mirror. A hole is drilled at the center of the class and the analog clock is mounted with its hands on the business side. The one problem with this setup is that since the light is being reflected, the clock will appear to run backwards. Not a problem, if you just reverse the polarity of the coil which moves the clockwork the projection will move in the expected clockwise direction.

[via Make]

Comments

  1. ZeroCool42 says:

    Yep, my first reaction when I saw this on Make the other day was “Why did I think of that???”

  2. ZeroCool42 says:

    didn’t*

    FAIL :(

  3. Hirudinea says:

    I like it, this could be adapter to all sorts of projection clocks, I’ed like to see what you could do with this technique and a search light! It’ BATTIME!

  4. M4CGYV3R says:

    I had one of these that was made as a promo for Budweiser or some such company. It had their logo at the bottom of the mirror, and the top half was an analog clock. When the sun would hit it in the afternoon, it would move a working clock projection across the floor. The backward part of the effect wasn’t that noticeable when we only glanced at it once every few hours.

    So while I didn’t think of it first, someone clearly did.

  5. neorazz says:

    what if you used the same method but cut card stock for the numbers and hand 2 wheels one stationary one mobile that would line up to the correct time as it rotated then projecting digital time while still fully analog if you wanted to go digital do the same thing but bounce the light thru a nokia type lcd with the backlight taken off like the lumenlab projectors

  6. MS3FGX says:

    Very clever, my brother has been asking me about doing a projection clock for him, I’ll have to send this along.

  7. strider_mt2k says:

    Great read. Great project.

  8. mad_max says:

    I like how you said “we” have a projection clock in “our” bedroom. Because apparently all the HaD writers bunk together.

  9. zrzzz says:

    At first, I thought “What?! that’s going to be backwards” But then I read the part about “reversing the polarity of the coil”.

    I don’t know if that’s going to work. But maybe you could use 2 mirrors or even a lens to invert the image.

  10. wernicke says:

    @neorazz,
    Huh? I’ve got no idea what you’re describing. Punctuation is your friend. (or should be)

  11. Garreth says:

    Wouldnt you need to read the clock mirrored? wouldnt the reflection go counterclockwise?

  12. dbear says:

    Thats cool but the extralight from the led would make the room too bright. Maybe some type shroud around the unit that would keep the extra light from going any way but up. A box with black plexi sides and a clear top should work great.
    Great hack.

  13. Renee says:

    Woah, hold on! Reversing the polarity actually WORKS? My life has changed fundamentally.

  14. SteveO says:

    better option – put a laser diode on each hand with a linear prism (idk the term… the thing that makes a laser level line…) to create each hand of the clock. then simply add 4 lasers for the time markers at 3, 6, 9, and 12.

    no crazy amount of light bleed in the room, no huge white square on the ceiling, and even the reversing issue can be fixed by simply flipping the clock over and mounting the lasers to the underside of the hands.

    mount it all to a piece of plexy and done. no focusing required, and you could shoot it at the side of a building in full daylight.

    • Max says:

      Er, Steve this was about a simple clock.
      So in your making it “better” we now need to consider how to get power to the lasers. Probably by a slip ring which adds resistance to the hand movement. Also your lasers add weight to the hands so on the “down” side the clock could run fast and on the “up” side run slow. Even if you keep it flat all the extra load of lasers and slip rings mean you might burn out the coil or at least need to recalibrate the whole thing. That may be a problem if it’s upright as well.

      Not really so simple now is it.

  15. Frogz says:

    holy crap….
    i personally use the rear projection method, bright led behind a lcd clock with reversed polariser so it has white on black text

  16. SteveO says:

    I will admit my solution is not simple… but I can solve the problem of the huge white square. instead of mirrors for the face, mirror just the hands and the numbers.

    fastest way is chrome spray paint. if you have everything else black, you will considerably reduce ambient light output.

    another way to reduce ambient light – and probably the best solution overall while remaining simple, mounting a mechanism inside a telescope style setup with the LED behind it would give this same effect but would allow the LED to be concealed.

  17. Whatnot says:

    I like projects with some sort of optics, and while not interested in a clock (and especially an analog one) this does give some ideas.

  18. fartface says:

    Not only did I think of it first, but so did someone else from 1920.

    http://www.clock-museum.co.uk/c111.htm

    As a note: it would have been a whole lot better if the clock was painted black and they had cut mirrors to fit the hands and “ticks”.. Most people are not a fan of having a lot of light in the bedroom at night.

  19. holly_smoke says:

    @SteveO

    I’m not sure that chrome spray paint would be reflective enough to work effectively.

    If you want to invert the display (dark background, light hands), the best method would be to cut new hands from a thin mirror and mount these on the existing assembly.

    Or you could simply mount small circles of mirror on the ends of the existing hands, to keep the amount of light to a minimum.

  20. none says:

    @SteveO & holly_smoke

    Is not as easy as it seems. You would need a very good alignment of all the little mirrors, specially the hands. Not to mention that these coils were designed to drag a very light piece of plastic, not a mirror.

    It’s a very good hack because of the simplicity.

  21. neorazz says:

    ok let me try again cut out the black bits like this example for the hours

    and this example for minutes

    would probably have to be laser cut (mirror image?)

    then use them as the hands on the clock .
    offset the center of the face so the cut out parts match a shroud at the same time as the back-light

    light shines thru cutout of current time making a projection on the ceiling without a mirror or fiddling with reversing the clockworks

  22. neorazz says:

    then only the time is projected and your light intensity could be greater

  23. I saw some high reflectivity paint at B&Q the other day, maybe someone can try that?

    Also did the reverse clock hack, it works on analogue watches too.

  24. filespace says:

    i think some spray adhesive and mylar film would do the trick for the hands… and fixed cut lexan mirrors for the markings/numbers on the face.

  25. filespace says:

    also…. a unfocused laser would work and possible a 4 inch shield around the clock with everything but the mirrors painted black..

  26. Whatnot says:

    uhm mylar? chrome paint?

    available everywhere, and universally handy to have in the cupboard.

  27. plumeau says:

    just put in another miror and you have it running foward!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 96,764 other followers