Laser-cut Album Released

In some alternate universe, where laser cutters and phonographs are more common than MP3 players, it makes a ton of sense to release laser-cutter files for your band’s new album (Translated). In this universe, it’s wacky and awesome.

The new EP from ASIC, alias [Patric] from Fablab Zürich, is out as PDF before it’s out in other forms of digital download, and the trailer video (embedded below the break) looks fantastic.

The release draws on this Instructable by Amanda Ghassaei to turn the music into PDFs suitable for feeding into a laser cutter, and we think it’s classy that she gets a shout-out on the label’s release page.  Everything else about the album will be released under a Creative Commons license to boot.

Burning a record is a tough test of your laser printer’s settings and calibration, and [Patric] is still working on optimizing for his Epilog 75 Watt Laser cutter. He promises to post up details as soon as he gets it perfected. Of course, you could just wait a week for the record release like a normal person, but where’s the fun in that? Fire up your lasers.

Thanks to Richard for the tip!

 

 

 

 

 

 

15 thoughts on “Laser-cut Album Released

  1. Wondering since I first read the Instructable a year ago, The resolution is a problem because the laser accepts only X, Y coordinates. If it´s possible to interface a servo attached turntable for spinning record blanks under the cutter, would this help mitigate some of the issues?

  2. This is relevant to my interests. I listen to a lot of records. I’m also a Field Service Engineer for TRUMPF lasers. I have (limited) access to pulse and continuous wave lasers from about 1000 to 10,000W and programmable focusing optics that can reproduce a path or shape in one pass from a stationary optic with X/Y galvo mirrors and variable Z axis (height).
    Have to think about this a bit.

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