Open Source Digital Cinema

Years in the making, Apertus has released 25 beta developer kits for AXIOM–their open source digital cinema camera. This isn’t your point-and-shoot digital camera. The original proof of concept from 2013 had a Zynq processor (a Zedboard), a super 35 4K image sensor, and a Nikon F-Mount.

The device today is modular with several options. For example, there is an HDMI output module, but  DisplayPort, 4K HDMI, and USB 3.0 options are in development. You can see several sample videos taken with the device, below.

Continue reading “Open Source Digital Cinema”

MATLAB and Simulink for Zynq

Although we see a lot of MATLAB use in industry and in academia, it isn’t as popular in the hacker community. That’s probably due to the cost. If you’ve ever wondered why companies will pay over $2000 for the base product, you might enjoy the video of a webinar covering using MATLAB and Simulink (a companion product) to program the CPU and FPGA on a Zynq Zedboard. Not interested because of the price? If you aren’t using it for commercial purposes, it isn’t as bad as you think.

MathWorks is one of those companies that likes to market by virtually giving away products to students with the hope that they’ll adopt the same tools when they land jobs in industry. Their flagship product, MATLAB, is well-entrenched in the labs and offices of big corporations. We’ve often thought that MATLAB is sort of what FORTRAN would look like if it had been developed in the last 20 years instead of 60 years ago. It is true that a base license for MATLAB is over $2000. However, if you aren’t using it for commercial purposes, and you can’t score a student license, you can get a personal license of MATLAB for about $150. The extra modules are also similarly reduced in price. If you are a student, the price drops to about $100, although many schools have licenses students can use at no cost to them.

If you watch the video from [Noam Levine], you’ll see you get your money’s worth. If you are wanting to configure the FPGA directly, this isn’t for you. But if you just want to accelerate a program by pushing DSP or other algorithms that can benefit from hardware assistance, MATLAB makes it very easy.

Continue reading “MATLAB and Simulink for Zynq”

Zedboard Multiport Ethernet

The Zedboard uses Xilinx’s Zynq, which is a combination ARM CPU and FPGA. [Jeff Johnson] recently posted an excellent two-part tutorial covering using a Zedboard with multiple Ethernet ports. The lwIP (light-weight Internet Protocol) stack takes care of the software end.

Vivado is Xilinx’s software for configuring the Zynq (among other chips), and the tutorial shows you how to use it. The Ethernet PHY is an FPGA Mezzanine Card (FMC) with four ports that is commercially available. The project uses VHDL, but there is no VHDL coding involved, just the use of canned components.

The real issue when using an FPGA and a CPU is the interface between the processor and the FPGA circuitry. In this case, the ARM standard AXI bus does this task, and the Ethernet component properly interfaces to that bus. The IP application in the second part of the post is an echo server.

We’ve seen the Zynq used in flying machines and also in a music synthesizer. Although this project doesn’t use any Verilog or VHDL that you create, it is still a great example of configuring using Vivado and using common components in a design.