Review: OSEPP STEM Kit 1, A Beginner’s All-in-One Board Found In The Discount Aisle

As the name implies, the OSEP STEM board is an embedded project board primarily aimed at education. You use jumper wires to connect components and a visual block coding language to make it go.

I have fond memories of kits from companies like Radio Shack that had dozens of parts on a board, with spring terminals to connect them with jumper wires. Advertised with clickbait titles like “200 in 1”, you’d get a book showing how to wire the parts to make a radio, or an alarm, or a light blinker, or whatever.

The STEM Kit 1 is sort of a modern arduino-powered version of these kits. The board hosts a stand-alone Arduino UNO clone (included with the kit) and also has a host of things you might want to hook to it. Things like the speakers and stepper motors have drivers on board so you can easily drive them from the arduino. You get a bunch of jumper wires to make the connections, too. Most things that need to be connected to something permanently (like ground) are prewired on the PCB. The other connections use a single pin. You can see this arrangement with the three rotary pots which have a single pin next to the label (“POT1”, etc.).

I’m a sucker for a sale, so when I saw a local store had OSEPP’s STEM board for about $30, I had to pick one up. The suggested price for these boards is $150, but most of the time I see them listed for about $100. At the deeply discounted price I couldn’t resist checking it out.

So does an embedded many-in-one project kit like this one live up to that legacy? I spent some time with the board. Bottom line, if you can find a deal on the price I think it’s worth it. At full price, perhaps not. Join me after the break as I walk through what the OSEPP has to offer.

What’s Onboard?

There are plenty of input and output devices:

  • 7 Push Buttons
  • Potentiometers (3 rotary and 1 slide)
  • Passive Infrared Sensor (PIR)
  • Light Sensor
  • Sound Sensor
  • LM35 Temperature Sensor
  • 10 LEDs (various colors)
  • Servo Motor
  • Stepper Motor
  • DC Motor
  • LCD Display
  • Buzzer
  • Speaker
  • RGB LED

In addition, the kit comes with an ultrasonic distance sensor in a little bracket that can connect to the stepper motor. That’s the only part that needs power and ground that isn’t already wired up.

Because the heart of the board is an Arduino UNO clone, you can do anything you like to program it. However, OSEPP touts their visual block diagram language that is basically Scratch. You can use it for free on most platforms and there is even a Web-based version although it can’t download code. It looks like Scratch or other block-oriented systems you’ve seen before.

I’m not usually fond of the visual block languages, but this one at least shows you the actual Arduino code it generates, so that isn’t bad. But you can still use any other method you like such as the standard IDE or PlatformIO.

You can see a video about the board, below.

The Good and the Bad

The board feels substantial and able to withstand a good bit of abuse. There’s a good range of components, and I like that the arduino is a real daughter board and not just built onto the PCB. Despite using the block language, I do like the tutorial booklet. It is very slick and has projects ranging from an IR doorbell to a mini piano. You can see a page below — very colorful and clear.

Of course, the suggested retail price of $150 is a bit offputting. You might think a breadboard with a handful of LEDs and other parts would be a much lower-cost option but just look around for arduino kits for beginners and you’ll find prices are all over the place. On the other hand, with a parts kit you would have to know how to wire up things like stepper motors or DC motors, so there is some value to having it already done for you. There’s also value in not having a bag of parts to misplace.

The jumper wires in the kit have pins on one side and sockets on the other. The pins go into the Arduino’s connector and the sockets go over pins on the components. These aren’t quite as reliable as a spring clip and not as versatile either.

In my mind the worst part of the kit design is that the pins are right next to each of the components. That’s good for understanding, but it makes a mess of wiring. For instance, there are ten LEDs, and connecting them all means stretching jumper wires to both edges of the board The jumpers aren’t very long either, so any complex project is going to have wires crisscrossing the sensors and LCD.

Granted, in this image I could have removed some of the wires from the bundles but that wouldn’t help that much, either. If you need to hook up more than a few of the available components you will have a mess. I would have put some sort of spring clip or even screw terminals and put them all on the top and bottom of the board with clear color-coded marking about where they connect. Then the wiring would all be out of the way. There are probably a few other ways they could have gone, and at this price, they could afford the few extra inches on the PCB.

There are a few other things that would have been nice touches to finish off this kit. I would have enjoyed a short chapter in the booklet about using the Arduino IDE directly so that people know it exists. And having even a small breadboard attached for your own exploration would make sense, but would then call for a different type of jumper wire.

Short Example Using the Distance Sensor

I wanted to do something with the board so I decided to play with the distance sensor and the servo. The distance sensor is a bit annoying both because you have to wire it all up and it has a tendency to fall off when you transport the board.

The demo (you can find it online) won’t win any originality prizes. The program moves the servo to scan from 0 to 180 degrees in 5 degree increments. It measures the distance of what’s in front of it. When it completes a scan, if it saw something close (you could adjust the sensitivity), it moves the sensor back to that position and waits 30 seconds. Otherwise, it keeps scanning.

Really, this is no different from any other Arduino program. That’s kind of the point. Despite the emphasis in the book on the point-and-click language, this is really just an Arduino.

In Summary

For the deep sale price I found, the board will work well for its intended audience of students or anyone starting out with Arduino or microcontrollers. Even a more advanced audience who just wants a way to hammer out a quick prototype might find it worth the $30 or $40 you can sometimes pay. But at full price, it is hard to imagine this makes sense because of the mess of wire routing and limited expansion options.

11 thoughts on “Review: OSEPP STEM Kit 1, A Beginner’s All-in-One Board Found In The Discount Aisle

  1. | …when I saw a local store had OSEPP’s STEM board for about $30…

    Let me guess: you live near a Fry’s store that seems to be liquidating its inventory, despite claims to the contrary?

    1. They’re definitely downsizing Fry’s, and I’ve discussed with people in other cities that say the same. I haven’t seen any really good deals, though. Their OSEPP stuff was always way too overpriced to consider actually buying any of it

      I’m still waiting for them to blow out this huge stack of ASUS Tinker boards that my local Fry’s has been sitting on. They’re still overpriced at $65.99 as of a couple weeks ago. $20 and I might think about it. Call it $9.99 and I’ll buy a few of them!

  2. There is a lot to be said for paying the full admission price the first time around assuming it is a good product. If you are new to electronics or micro controllers, with the kit you know all the pieces are going to fit together the way they should and all of the demo projects will work as advertised. If a noob has experienced friends etc that may make a big difference but for a noob striking off on their own, the kit has advantages.

    Those of you who have seen my replies probably know that I am cost sensitive, perhaps to a fault. However I see getting a bunch of random pieces off the internet and jumping in is probably not the best idea for someone new to the discipline. Most of the “little” boards you buy off the internet, the documentation is limited to the silk screening on the board, no schematics even. If the board has more than just a chip and bypass caps on it, a seasoned user knows to look the chip up and the board probably has near the reference design, but again, knowing that comes with experience.

    The readers here need to understand they have skill sets that they have developed, and are perhaps taking for granted.

    A good case in point is I have got a few people started playing with the ESP8266, and for them I always start them with a nodemcu type board. You can get right to coding without needing to worry about jumpers and FDDI’s and 3.3 or 5V, or even the power supply to run it from. Once they are a bit used to how the pieces all fit together the smaller boards make a lot more sense, and they have developed some skills.

  3. I fail to see much educational value in these kits, at least within the electronics field. You basically fire up the Arduino IDE, install the necessary library (say for stepper, LCD, ultrasonic sensor e.t.c.) and run the demo code. It is at best, an exercise in learning how to use an API, not an exercise in learning anything useful or tangible within the electronics field.

    Using scratch instead of Arduino reduces learning opportunities even further. It is a great way to learn a few programming constructs and “make things happen/move” in hardware. But there’s little opportunity to understand the “how” i.e. how this API “made things happen/move”

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